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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
August 13, 1962
GARY ALSO PLAYEDSirs:I was really "teed off" by your article on the PGA tournament (The Trouble with Leading an Army, July 30). Of the 27 paragraphs, exactly one was devoted to Gary Player, the winner. Mr. Palmer is a wonderful golfer and gentleman, but I was sick, of hearing about him.
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August 13, 1962

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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GARY ALSO PLAYED
Sirs:
I was really "teed off" by your article on the PGA tournament (The Trouble with Leading an Army, July 30). Of the 27 paragraphs, exactly one was devoted to Gary Player, the winner. Mr. Palmer is a wonderful golfer and gentleman, but I was sick, of hearing about him.

For anyone who watched the final round of this "dull" tournament, it was the tremendous drive put on by Bob Goalby and the great heart displayed by Gary Player that provided the PGA with its extremely exciting and dramatic close.
SUSAN SCHIELE
Belleville, Ill.

Sirs:
Arnold Palmer's Army wasn't really the story of the PGA. You related the obvious: the throngs following a dynamic star. But you failed:

1) to find any drama in Gary Player's achievement in winning the second of the three most important tournaments in our country (after being eliminated from the final 36 holes at Troon a week before);

2) to mention that Palmer was probably "burned out" after winning the British Open;

3) to comment on what may become an important innovation in golf—that of spectator stands which were introduced at Aronimink.
EDWARD J. HALLIGAN
Ridgefield, N.J.

Sirs:
When a giant arises in any field there are usually two types of reaction. There are those who wish to take an easy way out by thinking, "It isn't fair for one to dominate for so long." Then there are those who are resolved to go out there and beat him. It is this latter kind of determination that seems to have put Arnold Palmer on top. Even when he was completely out of contention in the PGA, Palmer thought he could shoot a 62 and win. The fact that he failed means only one thing—he'll probably be more determined than ever in his next tournament. Palmer is still the champion.
ROBERT REYNOLDS
Hagerstown, Md.

THE VIGOR WE HAVE
Sirs:
I received your July 16 issue containing The Vigor We Need by President Kennedy at the same time that we here in Peoria were preparing a welcome-home celebration for Miss Susan Mary Haynes, who was recently designated Miss Physical Fitness for 1962 at the Dance Educators Convention in New York.

Susan, now a 15-year-old high school cheerleader and acrobatic dancer, was handicapped as a small child by a bone disease in her legs and originally her parents provided her with dancing lessons for therapeutic purposes. Before her return to Peoria she had spent two or three weeks in New York giving demonstrations of fitness exercises. She is next scheduled to give similar demonstrations at the World's Fair in Seattle starting August 11. It occurred to me these events nicely complement President Kennedy's program.
ROBERT G. DAY
MAYOR
Peoria, Ill.

Sirs:
"The vigor we need" we already have! The returns of the U.S.- U.S.S.R. track meet further convinced me of this (Whirling Success for the U.S., July 30). I sincerely believe that we have a great potential as leaders in both the women's and the men's events—and I mean all of them. The talents of our women remain faithfully untapped. Men have the chance to develop skills in track, while most girls don't even know what a javelin is. We girls, excluding swimmers, are neglected.

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