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The fantastic round of happy Homero
Dan Jenkins
September 03, 1962
A tight and tricky Texas course became the site of the most remarkable 18 holes of tournament golf in memory when a University of Houston senior posted 13 birdies and one eagle to shoot a 55
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September 03, 1962

The Fantastic Round Of Happy Homero

A tight and tricky Texas course became the site of the most remarkable 18 holes of tournament golf in memory when a University of Houston senior posted 13 birdies and one eagle to shoot a 55

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"I used to hit a long, high hook," he added, "and I thought it was smart to try and hit a shorter iron to the green than anybody else. But now I've shortened my backswing, so I hit straighten"

It was three years ago at the Masters that Blancas was first talked about. The speaker was a fellow Houston resident, Jimmy Demaret.

Demaret was bragging about a handsome boy, the son of a maintenance man at Houston's fashionable old River Oaks Country Club, who could give most amateurs two strokes a nine and win. Said Jimmy: "I've seen a lot of young hotshots, but this kid can really play. I'd like to back him on the tour right now." So would a lot of other people, according to Houston Coach Williams, and they were standing in line for the-opportunity long before Blancas shot the 55.

"The kid has been working at golf since he was 8," says Williams. "He's a terrific all-round player, with more good shots than any college boy I've ever seen. And we've had some excellent ones."

Despite the Premier course's strange measurements, Blancas needed a wider assortment of his "good" shots there than anyone might suspect. To fully appreciate his achievement, one need only consider how he played the course. (The distances are approximate, as different tees are used on each nine.)

The first hole is a 325-yard drive and nine-iron that he birdied twice; the second, a 475-yard par 5 that he played with a daring shortcut drive and eight-iron, chipping in for an eagle and par-ring; the third, a 210-yard par 4, where he used an iron and wedge for two birdies; the fourth, a 100-yard par 3 that he birdied twice with a nine-iron; the fifth, a 350-yard par 4, where he drove with a long iron and wedged for one birdie; the sixth, a 105-yard nine-iron or wedge shot that he birdied twice; the seventh, a 310-yarder, where he used a driver and wedge for one birdie; the eighth, a 165-yard par 3, where he hit a six-iron for one birdie; and the ninth, a 500-yard par 5, where he used a driver, four-wood and chip for two birdies.

Many of Texas' finest golfers have played Premier over the past years, but Blancas' round was five strokes better than anyone had ever scored there before. Jacky Cupit, who grew up near by, held the previous record at 60.

As of now, Blancas' main concerns are trying to qualify for the U.S. Amateur at Pinehurst and getting his degree at Houston. But a pro career is undoubtedly his destiny.

Last weekend he was asked if he patterned himself after any pro.

"My idol, I suppose, is Ben Hogan," he said, "but I don't think anybody will accuse me of swinging like him."

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