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A roundup of the sports information of the week
October 01, 1962
BAIT CASTING—JON TARANTINO, 26-year-old furniture importer from San Francisco and many-time amateur casting champion, bettered a world record of his own at the world tournament in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Tarantino snapped a 5/8-ounce line (on a revolving spool) a distance of 444 feet 9� inches, nearly a dozen feet farther than his listed mark.
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October 01, 1962

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BAIT CASTING—JON TARANTINO, 26-year-old furniture importer from San Francisco and many-time amateur casting champion, bettered a world record of his own at the world tournament in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Tarantino snapped a 5/8-ounce line (on a revolving spool) a distance of 444 feet 9� inches, nearly a dozen feet farther than his listed mark.

BOATING—WEATHERLY added two more wins to her first victory in the America's Cup series off Newport, R.I., but a surprisingly powerful Gretel won a thriller as the international event went into its second week (see page 36).

BOXING—BILL NIELSON of Omaha was awarded the decision in his 10-round match in Omaha against Heavyweight Ernie Cab of The Bronx, but only after Referee Gene Buzzello stopped the fight in the last round to take a long look at Nielson's arm. Sure enough, Cab had bitten it.

FOOTBALL—NFL: NEW YORK blasted the attack of the Eagles (three blocked field goals; three intercepted passes), and produced a penetrating offense of its own for a 29-13 victory in Philadelphia. But the presumably renovated Cleveland Browns had trouble. They lost to those traditional losers, the Redskins, when Washington's Bobby Mitchell caught a short pass over center and went 50 yards in the closing minutes for a 17-16 upset win in Cleveland. Rumbling along nicely, however, were the champion Green Bay Packers, who finally clawed apart a tenacious St. Louis defense, 17-0, in Milwaukee, with Paul Hornung getting 11 points. Detroit scored the first four times it had the ball against the 49ers, and Milt Plum threw four touchdown passes for Detroit as the Lions won 45-24. In Minneapolis the Baltimore Colts took charge with a crushing (and surprising) ground attack, beating the Vikings 34-7. Chicago tripped the Rams 27-23 in Los Angeles, a victory ironically sparked by two former Ram players. Quarterback Bill Wade and Fullback Joe Marconi. By throwing a pair of touchdown passes in a 30-28 win over Dallas, Pittsburgh's Bobby Layne broke two of Sammy Baugh's longstanding NFL records: TD passes, now 189, and completed passes, now 1,713.

AFL: BOSTON gathered a tight defense together to squash sharp-shooting Frank Tripucka, and had End Gino Cappelletti out to score one touchdown, two field goals and five conversions. The Patriots downed Denver 41-16, in Boston, although ex- University of Oregon Hurdle Champion Jerry Tarr sped 97 yards with a touchdown pass for a new AFL record. Houston joined Boston and New York at the top of the Eastern Division by spattering San Diego 42-17 in San Diego, with Halfback Billy Cannon scoring three touchdowns. Winless Buffalo was beaten by the New York Titans' running (Halfback Dick Christy) and passing (Quarterback Lee Gross-cup), losing 17-6 before a home audience. In Oakland, Calif. hometown boy Chris Burford led the Dallas Texans' attack by catching three touchdown passes to help Dallas to a 26-16 victory.

GOLF—LABRON HARRIS JR., 20, a graduate student of statistics at Oklahoma Slate where his father is the golf coach, staged a thrilling late rally over the difficult Pinehurst No. 2 course to beat 24-year-old Downing Gray of Pensacola, Fla. 1 up for the U.S. Amateur title (see page 24).

Jack Nicklaus withstood a fine performance by Australian Bruce Crampton (he broke the course record by a stroke), and a strong closing rush by George Bayer to win the $25,000 Portland (Ore.) Open. Nicklaus completed the four-day tournament 19 below par in spite of being assessed a rare two-stroke penalty for slow play (see page 12).

Allan Breed of Wethersfield, Conn. upset favored Henri de Lamaze of France in the third round of the Italian international amateur tournament in Como, a celebrity-filled event that saw Belgium's ex-King Leopold and Hollywood's Bing Crosby left uncrowned and unsung following first-round defeats.

HARNESS RACING—LEHIGH HANOVER ($3.20), smartly handled by Stanley Dancer, broke the two-minute mark twice (1:58[4/5], 1:59[3/5]) to win two heats and the $75,038 Little Brown Jug pace at the Delaware ( Ohio) County fairgrounds' half-mile track (see page 47).

Porterhouse ($9.30) came home the winner of the $50,000 H.T.A. final trot at Roosevelt Raceway, but it wasn't horsepower that won the race. The leader and favorite, Duke Rodney, seemed headed for victory at the 16th pole, but hard-pressing Matastar slipped there and hooked wheels with the Duke's sulky. This allowed Porterhouse to move up and win by a length and a half, with Orbiter second. Following an inquiry, Matastar was allotted fifth and Duke Rodney an unfortunate fourth.

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