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SCORECARD
October 22, 1962
SOFT SHOES FOR SONNY
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October 22, 1962

Scorecard

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? Frank McGuire, who left a $35,000 contract when the NBA Warriors went from Philadelphia to San Francisco, has visited the East Carolina College campus several times, may yet be taken on as basketball coach.

WHO'S TOUGH WHERE?

Addressing U.S. attorneys at the White House the other day, President Kennedy reported on the success of the administration's drive against organized crime, which draws much of its basic revenue from illegal gambling. We had reported on this, too, in our September 3 issue (The Bookies Close Up Shop) and the President apparently was drawing on that article when he told the attorneys:

"One Las Vegas gambler is supposed to have said he hoped we'd be as tough on Berlin as we've been on Las Vegas. Well, we intend to be."

What the gambler, an embittered fellow, actually said was:

"They lost in Laos, they lost in Cuba, they lost in East Berlin, but they sure are giving the gamblers a beating."

Although the President is guilty of misquotation, we would like to believe that his statement—and not the gambler's—reflects our international position.

ON STAYING AMATEUR

Recently it was reported that Philip Morris ( Australia) Ltd., had offered Aussie tennis champs Rod Laver and Roy Emerson public relations jobs at about $10,000 a year, contingent on their remaining amateur. The reports were accurate but incomplete. They failed to mention that the offers did not originate in Melbourne but in the New York offices of Joseph Cullman, the American president of the American parent company.

Joe Cullman is a longtime tennis buff as well as a shrewd cigarette salesman. Besides wishing to please his Australian customers, he believes that his deal, if accepted, would be good for tennis as a whole. Too many top amateurs, in Cullman's opinion, have turned pro. In case open tennis comes (an eventuality Cullman favors), the presence of Laver and Emerson as amateurs would provide a wholesome balance in tournaments.

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