SI Vault
 
SCORECARD
November 19, 1962
THE GAME'S THE THINGDespite their abysmal start (three wins in 13 games) the New York Rangers have already drawn to their first six home games some 17,000 more spectators than they did last year for the same six. And the Boston Bruins, firmly lodged in last place in the National Hockey League, are nevertheless averaging more than 11,000 per game, just as they did last year. In fact, club officials report the Bruins are making more money than last season because Bostonians are deserting the balcony seats for higher-priced locations downstairs. First-place Detroit averaged 9,600 per game at this time last year, is drawing over 10,700 this year, while second-place Chicago has jumped from a five-game total of 39,900 last year to over 54,100 this time. Only Toronto and Montreal have failed to record sizable increases. But then, who can blame them? They were SRO last year, they are SRO this year and they will be SRO next year, and the next and the next.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 19, 1962

Scorecard

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

THE GAME'S THE THING
Despite their abysmal start (three wins in 13 games) the New York Rangers have already drawn to their first six home games some 17,000 more spectators than they did last year for the same six. And the Boston Bruins, firmly lodged in last place in the National Hockey League, are nevertheless averaging more than 11,000 per game, just as they did last year. In fact, club officials report the Bruins are making more money than last season because Bostonians are deserting the balcony seats for higher-priced locations downstairs. First-place Detroit averaged 9,600 per game at this time last year, is drawing over 10,700 this year, while second-place Chicago has jumped from a five-game total of 39,900 last year to over 54,100 this time. Only Toronto and Montreal have failed to record sizable increases. But then, who can blame them? They were SRO last year, they are SRO this year and they will be SRO next year, and the next and the next.

POSTLUDE WITH TWO FUGUES

The tragicomic aftermath of the tragicomic Sonny Liston-Floyd Patterson heavyweight title fight continues.

?Patterson returned from a trip with his wife and announced that once more he had donned false whiskers to escape attention, this time in three foreign countries that, inexplicably, he refused to name. (There is some doubt that he went abroad at all.) He said he would like to fight Liston again in March at New York's Madison Square Garden. The hitches: The Garden is pretty much booked for March; Liston is not licensed in New York and probably won't be.

?Patterson's manager, Cus D'Amato, unable to raise a $100,000 guarantee, was forced to cancel the middleweight title fight between his Jos� Torres and Paul Pender. Torres said Patterson had refused to lend D'Amato the money. Possible reasons: Torres once decked Patterson in training and talked about it to the embarrassment of the then champion; Torres, writing in a Spanish-language newspaper, picked Liston to knock out Patterson. D'Amato, who made a rich man of Patterson, is deeply in debt because he insists on supporting a stable of nonworking fighters. Generally, it's the fighter who goes broke, the manager who gets rich.

?The unpredictable Liston, booked for his nightclub debut at the Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, where he was to appear with Louis Armstrong and Janet Blair, lit out for St. Louis and booked himself for an appearance there, all without notifying his agent, Joe Glaser.

PASS PERFORMANCE KING

The Ivy League total offense record for a single game (337 yards, set by Cornell's Gary Wood) was broken twice last weekend and by the same player. Dartmouth's Quarterback Billy King (see page 66) did it when he completed his fourth touchdown pass against Columbia in the third quarter of a 42-0 rout. He then retired to the bench with a 348-yard record.

In the fourth quarter King returned to the game to hold for a field-goal attempt. The center's snap was high. King tried to run and was thrown for a 12-yard loss. Back went the record to Wood.

With two minutes left to play, no one on the bench was aware that a record had been made and lost. The statisticians, however, passed the information to the spotters, who passed it to Coach Bob Blackman, who passed it to King, who went into the game and passed for 12 yards and set the record all over again.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5