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Turnabout on a sloppy Saturday
Whitney Tower
November 19, 1962
Two leading stables traded upset victories at Aqueduct and Garden State Park, and one side effect was a change in the winter book for next season's Kentucky Derby
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November 19, 1962

Turnabout On A Sloppy Saturday

Two leading stables traded upset victories at Aqueduct and Garden State Park, and one side effect was a change in the winter book for next season's Kentucky Derby

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Should Candy Spots turn out to be the big California horse in 1963, as Swaps was in 1955, the new season will be in for tremendous excitement. Racing needs sectional rivalries and it is high time we again had one that has a chance to be decided on the race track instead of by the vote of experts. Nothing was better for racing than the rivalry between Swaps and Nashua in 1955 and the Round Table-Hillsdale-Sword Dancer competition in the fall of 1959. If we could have Candy Spots, Crewman and Never Bend shooting for the Triple Crown in 1963, who could ask for anything more?

The 11th running of the often criticized and, in recent years, often uninteresting Laurel International last Monday proved that a good horse can indeed hurdle the confusions and barriers of international racing. When France's Match II defeated the three best American Thoroughbreds in training—Kelso, Carry Back and Beau Purple—he did it with facility and won the race with a fine closing run through the short Laurel stretch. Normally the horse that leads into the stretch in the International ends up in the winner's circle, but Match rolled along inside of Kelso and Carry Back and won cantering off by a length and a half.

Jockey Yves Saint-Martin, the 21-year-old "golden boy" of French racing, was instructed to scoot away from the tape barrier as fast as possible and dog the early pacemakers. Saint-Martin got Match off perfectly but immediately found himself trapped. Rather than spend his horse in trying to reach the leaders again, Saint-Martin held off until the half-mile pole before starting his run.

Kelso and Carry Back had no excuses at all for defeat, but I truthfully don't think that Kelso is half as good a runner on grass as he is on dirt. Beau Purple, slightly favored over Kelso in the betting, was run down by Kelso and it seems that if someone runs in front with Beau Purple, then Beau Purple will capitulate.

Match's victory now gives foreign horses an edge of six to five in the International and earns for Match the title of "Horse of the World." Match, who was the beaten favorite in the Prix de l' Arc de Triomphe in October, will be flown back to Owner Francois Dupr�'s farm at Chantilly but anyone who wants to buy the colt need only put up $600,000. In these days of million-dollar syndicate purchasers, the odds are that 5600,000 will be forthcoming swiftly.

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