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A roundup of the sports information of the week
January 14, 1963
BASKETBALL—NBA: LOS ANGELES left its fans hoarse but happy, beating Boston on successive nights 125-123 and 106-104. Frank Selvy scored 36 points, primarily on long field goals, to make the Lakers' first victory possible. With the score tied for the 17th time and with two seconds left. Rudy LaRusso sank two foul shots to win the second game. Los Angeles beat Cincinnati and held on to its safe lead in the Western Division. Second-place St. Louis split four games and Detroit closed in on third-place San Francisco by taking three of four. The Warriors had just the opposite record, only winning when Wilt Chamberlain scored 50 points against Chicago. The Zephyrs lost three straight. Syracuse gained a game and a half on Boston in the Eastern Division and Cincinnati lost three of five, averaging 119 points a game. New York lost its first and last games but won two in between for an above-average week. In fact, the Knicks came close to winning all four. They lost to the Pistons 103-102 and blew an almost-certain victory when they came up with just nine points in the fourth quarter against the Royals, who went on to win in overtime.
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January 14, 1963

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASKETBALL—NBA: LOS ANGELES left its fans hoarse but happy, beating Boston on successive nights 125-123 and 106-104. Frank Selvy scored 36 points, primarily on long field goals, to make the Lakers' first victory possible. With the score tied for the 17th time and with two seconds left. Rudy LaRusso sank two foul shots to win the second game. Los Angeles beat Cincinnati and held on to its safe lead in the Western Division. Second-place St. Louis split four games and Detroit closed in on third-place San Francisco by taking three of four. The Warriors had just the opposite record, only winning when Wilt Chamberlain scored 50 points against Chicago. The Zephyrs lost three straight. Syracuse gained a game and a half on Boston in the Eastern Division and Cincinnati lost three of five, averaging 119 points a game. New York lost its first and last games but won two in between for an above-average week. In fact, the Knicks came close to winning all four. They lost to the Pistons 103-102 and blew an almost-certain victory when they came up with just nine points in the fourth quarter against the Royals, who went on to win in overtime.

CHESS—BOBBY FISCHER, almost an oldtimer at 19, regained the U.S. title he did not defend last year by winning six of his last seven matches.

FOOTBALL—COLLEGE: USC's best offense was the pass—Quarterback Pete Beathard threw for four touchdowns—and its only defense was the clock as it held off Wisconsin 42-37 in the Rose Bowl. Wisconsin, trailing 42-14 in the final period, scored three touchdowns and a safety before time ran out. Badger Quarterback Ron VanderKelen completed 33 of 48 passes for 401 yards. In the Sugar Bowl, MISSISSIPPI augmented Glynn Griffing's passing, good for 242 yards and one score, with a resolute defense to thwart Arkansas 17-13. TEXAS ran into an even tougher situation in the Cotton Bowl. The Longhorns never got inside the LSU 25-yard line as they lost 13-0. Lynn Amedee of the Tigers, however, roamed all over, running and passing to set up two field goals, which he personally kicked, and recovering a fumble before teammate Jimmy Field's 22-yard touchdown run. President Kennedy was upstaged at the Orange Bowl. He sat in a brown stuffed chair, but ALABAMA Quarterback Joe Namath looked as relaxed as if he had borrowed the President's rocker. End Dick Williamson caught a 25-yard scoring pass by Namath to lead Bear Bryant's team to a 17-0 win over Oklahoma. Said Oklahoma's frank Bud Wilkinson: "We were out-coached." It was defense again that won in the Gator Bowl, though Tommy Shannon's two touchdown passes gave FLORIDA the offensive punch to upset Penn State 17-7. Although Jerry Gross of Detroit set Senior Bowl marks with 24 completions for 317 yards, it was three touchdown passes by Mississippi's Griffing that enabled the SOUTH to prevail 33-27.

NFL: DETROIT, with Ken Webb scoring on a 20-yard pass from Milt Plum and a two-yard run, beat Pittsburgh 17-10 in the Playoff Bowl in Miami.

HOCKEY—NHL: TORONTO lost twice and trailed last-place Boston 3-0 before retaliating for a 4-2 win over the Bruins and, a day later, a 5-1 conquest of Chicago, thus ending a week that left the Maple Leafs and Black Hawks tied for the league lead in the tight NHL race. Goalie Jacques Plante allowed just three scores as Montreal (2-0-1) moved to within one point of the front-runners, while Detroit could only manage one loss and two ties. League scoring leader Andy Bathgate of New York (1-1-2) set a modern record when he got a goal in 10 consecutive games. Boston began by shutting out the Maple Leafs 3-0 and finished by scoring three goals in the final 10 minutes to tie the Red Wings 5-5, but lost twice between these displays of power.

MOTOR SPORTS—JOHN SURTEES of Britain, a former world motorcycle champion, won the 167-mile New Zealand Grand Prix in his 2.7 Lola in Auckland. World Champion Graham Hill was running second until forced out by clutch trouble on the last lap.

RODEO—JIM SHOULDERS of Henryetta, Okla. won the All-Round Cowboy award and Eddie Conway of Globe, Ariz. was the top money winner ($1,466) at the Cotton Bowl Rodeo in Dallas.

SKIING—TORALF ENGAN, 26-year-old Norwegian, was the unofficial world ski-jumping champion after finishing first at Oberstdorf, Innsbruck and Garmisch-Partenkirchen and third at Bischofshofen in the International Four-Hill competition. Thorbjoern Yggeseth of Norway was second. Top U.S. jumper was John Balfanz, 22, whose surprisingly good fourth-place performance bolstered the country's hopes for a sound Winter Olympics showing in 1964.

Bud Werner, a senior at the University of Colorado, and BARBARA FERRIES, a Colorado freshman, won the men's and women's combined titles at the country's first Olympic Alpine training camp in Vail, Colo. (see page 12).

SQUASH RACQUETS—HASHIM KHAN, a Detroit professional, defeated Mohibullah Khan, his nephew, 15-6, 10-15, 15-10, 11-15, 15-12 for the U.S. Open singles title in New York.

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