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A roundup of the sports information of the week
February 18, 1963
BASKETBALL—NBA: Syracuse, winning all five games, including a 126-109 victory over first-place Boston, has toughened into a strong second-place team in the East, as it showed by beating Detroit 162-135. Boston, meanwhile, won four, with Bill Russell passing Dolph Schayes of Syracuse as the league's alltime rebounder. His total is 11,022 in less than seven seasons. San Francisco's Wilt Chamberlain was held down as defenses worked hard on him, his only big night being 56 points in a win over Cincinnati. The Warriors also beat Detroit 117-116 to take over third place in the Western Division after the Pistons had lost 120-105 to second-place St. Louis. Chicago, game but guileless in last place, played four times, lost each one after a close battle. In three games with the league-leading Los Angeles Lakers—slowed by the absence of Jerry West—Chicago lost in the last few minutes, all by a total of six points. New York had worse luck. The Knicks played Boston twice and Syracuse twice, losing all four without a murmur.
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February 18, 1963

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASKETBALL—NBA: Syracuse, winning all five games, including a 126-109 victory over first-place Boston, has toughened into a strong second-place team in the East, as it showed by beating Detroit 162-135. Boston, meanwhile, won four, with Bill Russell passing Dolph Schayes of Syracuse as the league's alltime rebounder. His total is 11,022 in less than seven seasons. San Francisco's Wilt Chamberlain was held down as defenses worked hard on him, his only big night being 56 points in a win over Cincinnati. The Warriors also beat Detroit 117-116 to take over third place in the Western Division after the Pistons had lost 120-105 to second-place St. Louis. Chicago, game but guileless in last place, played four times, lost each one after a close battle. In three games with the league-leading Los Angeles Lakers—slowed by the absence of Jerry West—Chicago lost in the last few minutes, all by a total of six points. New York had worse luck. The Knicks played Boston twice and Syracuse twice, losing all four without a murmur.

BOATING—MRS. PAT DUANE, with husband Jack as crew, hiked out on her 20-foot Hang Over to win three times and finish second twice for a total of 79� points, successfully defending her Midwinter Flying Dutchman title at Tampa, Fla.

BOWLING—ANDY MARZICH of Long Beach, Calif. rolled five straight strikes in the final round to win the $24,000 St. Louis Open with a last-game 238, his second PBA tour victory in a month.

BOXING—LASZLO PAPP, 36, the only acknowledged professional athlete behind the Iron Curtain (to claim the European middleweight title he had to openly accept professional status), battered Britain's George Aldridge for 14 rounds in Vienna, then sent him down so solidly in the 15th that the referee didn't bother to count. The victory brought Papp's record to 20 wins and two draws and put him in a position to challenge the winner of the Dick Tiger-Gene Fullmer world championship bout later this month.

Emile Griffith, world welterweight title-holder, celebrated his 25th birthday by defeating Chris Christensen of Denmark by a TKO in the ninth round in Copenhagen.

FIGURE SKATING—THE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS in Long Beach, Calif. saw a display of talent that could help the U.S. begin to reestablish itself as a leading nation in figure skating. Boston's Albertina Noyes, 14, the 1961 novice titlist, won the junior ladies'; Tommy Litz, in third place after the compulsory figures, unwound two triple jumps to win the senior men's over the defending champion, Monty Hoyt, and Lorraine Hanlon, 17, of Boston won the senior ladies' title.

The European Championship, in Budapest, awarded the men's title to Alain Calmat of France, whose only real opposition, ailing Karol Divin, of Czechoslovakia, could not compete. Sjoukje Dijkstra, a 21-year-old Dutch girl, took her fourth straight European women's title. The pairs competition was won by West Germany's Marika Kilius, 20, and Hans-J�rgen B�umler, 21, who put on a dazzling display to earn the highest scores ever given in a European championship. In second and third places were the two Russian pairs, whose imaginative presentation indicated the U.S.S.R. has mastered another sport.

GOLF—NANCY ROTH, a 23-year-old amateur from Hollywood, Fla., won her third major tournament in a row, the Palm Beach Women's Amateur, by defeating National Amateur Champion JoAnne Gunderson 2 and 1.

HOCKEY—NHL: It was a week of only seven games, and five were ties, but one that really counted was a 2-1 victory by fourth-place Detroit over Toronto. The Leafs had been tied for second with Montreal. The Canadiens pulled out a 5-5 tie with last-place Boston for the one point that gave them sole possession of second. The other unbalanced score was a 6-3 upset by New York over Montreal. Don McKenney, traded from Boston, broke the tie for the Rangers and assisted on the clinching goal, while iron man Gump Worsley had seven stitches taken in his scalp in the first period and came back to hold Montreal scoreless. He also made 32 saves in a 3-3 tie with the league-leading Chicago Black Hawks.

HORSE RACING—KELSO ($6.70) surged out of fourth place on the final turn to run down a prestige field that included Ridan and Jaipur and win the $58,200 Seminole Handicap at Hialeah by a convincing 2� lengths under Jockey Ismael Valenzuela.

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