SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
June 03, 1963
BASEBALL—In a straight player deal JERRY LYNCH, whose pinch-hitting prowess helped the Cincinnati Reds to a 1961 pennant and coined the phrase "Lynch in the Pinch," was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Outfielder BOB SKINNER. The Washington Senators and New York Mets were also swapping. Soft-spoken GIL HODGES, 39, a major leaguer for 18 years (Dodgers and Mets), left New York and the National League to manage the Washington Senators, as unpredictable JIMMY PIERSALL journeyed up from Washington to become a Met. Meanwhile the Washington infield was graced by a freshman Senator just up from the minors. Name: JOHN KENNEDY.
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June 03, 1963

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASEBALL—In a straight player deal JERRY LYNCH, whose pinch-hitting prowess helped the Cincinnati Reds to a 1961 pennant and coined the phrase " Lynch in the Pinch," was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Outfielder BOB SKINNER. The Washington Senators and New York Mets were also swapping. Soft-spoken GIL HODGES, 39, a major leaguer for 18 years ( Dodgers and Mets), left New York and the National League to manage the Washington Senators, as unpredictable JIMMY PIERSALL journeyed up from Washington to become a Met. Meanwhile the Washington infield was graced by a freshman Senator just up from the minors. Name: JOHN KENNEDY.

Party-loving BO BELINSKY, left-handed pitcher with a 1-7 won-lost record, having proved an angel fit only for falling, was sent to Hawaii of the Pacific Coast League by the Los Angeles Angels and will not return until his form does.

BASKETBALL—The world championships bounced to a close in Rio de Janeiro with Defending Champion BRAZIL clinching the seven-team round-robin tourney with a perfect 6-0 record. A surprising Yugoslavia team finished second with 5-1 while Russia finished third with two losses ( Brazil and Yugoslavia). The U.S. dribbled into fourth place, losing to all three top finishers.

After three years as coach of the Royals, CHARLEY WOLF decided to leave both Cincinnati and the Eastern Division and signed a two-year contract as coach of the Detroit Pistons. He replaces Dick McGuire, who resigned April 15 after one of the Pistons' worst seasons yet (won 34, lost 46). Wolf had compiled a 125-130 record and taken the Royals to the NBA playoffs twice, but felt insecure at the helm. "I got the message," he said, "when Warren Hensel [the Royals' new owner] didn't invite me to the NBA college draft meeting this spring. I gathered I didn't fit into the new owner's plans." Owner Hensel's comment: "Absolutely perfect for everybody concerned."

CHESS—After two long, long months, the ninth world chess champion was finally crowned in Moscow when Russian Challenger TIGRAN PETROSYAN defeated world champion and fellow countryman Mikhail Botvinnik 12� points to 9�. Called " Tiger" by his wife and "Iron Petrosyan" by the Soviet public, the young (33) challenger simply tired out his older (51) opponent in the 24-game series.

GOLF—In weather only Scots could love—hail, sleet, wind and rain—the British Walker Cup team threatened to upset a royal and ancient tradition by taking a 6-to-3-point lead over the favored U.S. in Turn-berry, Scotland, but next day under clear skies the American amateurs returned to form and won the Walker Cup for the 18th time in 19 attempts dating back to 1922 (see page 54).

HARNESS RACING—The $231,000 Harness Tracks of America spring pace series came to a close with an upset victory at Chicago's Sportsman's Park. Stanley Dancer guided LEHIGH HANOVER ($6.S0) to a one-length triumph over Adora's Dream, who had gone undefeated in the five preliminary races throughout the country.

HOCKEY—After much hemming, hawing and hedging, the Chicago Black Hawks finally fired Coach RUDY PILOUS. With the club since 1958, when the Hawks ended up fifth and out of the cellar for the first time in four years, Pilous improved on the record with four third-place finishes and a Stanley Cup victory in 1961. Then last season, with their first league championship seemingly clinched, the Hawks went into a spin, yielded first place to Toronto and the Stanley Cup semifinals to Detroit. Their dreary finish was too much for Co-Owner James D. Norris, and Raconteur Rudy was out. A likely successor: BILLY REAY, who coached the Hawks' Buffalo Bisons to an American Hockey League championship this past season.

HORSE RACING—With Manuel Ycaza in the irons, FIRM POLICY ($5.70) scampered to a 4�-length triumph over pace-setting Tamarona in the $55,200 Top Flight Handicap at Aqueduct. Favorite Cicada finished a tired third, seven lengths back of the winner.

Doc Jocoy ($12.60), with Willie Harmatz aboard, overtook Crazy Kid in the stretch and just won the $55,350 Los Angeles Handicap at Inglewood. Favorite Winonly, trying to score his second straight triumph in the race, couldn't catch the two flying front-runners and finished third.

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