SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 08, 1963
PENNANTITISSirs:It appears to me that William Leggett, author of Bill Dailey, Wont You Please Come In (July 1), is suffering from an acute attack of the disease, common to non-Yankee fans, known as first-place jealousy. Symptoms of the disease include: illusions that the patient's favorite team has suffered more serious injuries than the Yankees, downgrading everything connected with the Yankees and straying from the major point of conversation (in this case the subject of his article, Bill Dailey).
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
July 08, 1963

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

PENNANTITIS
Sirs:
It appears to me that William Leggett, author of Bill Dailey, Wont You Please Come In (July 1), is suffering from an acute attack of the disease, common to non-Yankee fans, known as first-place jealousy. Symptoms of the disease include: illusions that the patient's favorite team has suffered more serious injuries than the Yankees, downgrading everything connected with the Yankees and straying from the major point of conversation (in this case the subject of his article, Bill Dailey).

The patient may even resort to propaganda, telling about the greatness but modesty of his favorite team. However, have no fear. The disease always cures itself at about the middle or end of September, just after the Yankees have won still another pennant—at least it has done so for 12 out of the last 14 years.
PAUL SANDERS
Jericho, N.Y.

LOSING FACE
Sirs:
I've been reading SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for quite awhile, and I must admit that I've been pretty pleased with the fine layout of the magazine, so you can imagine my shock when I took a look at the cover of the June 24 issue and saw all the mistakes. Like for instance, you caption the picture "Baseball's Best Reliever," but then you spell his name all wrong. See, baseball's best reliever spells his name D-I-C-K R-A-D-A-T-Z, not R-O-Y F-A-C-E. And you got the picture all messed up, too. See, Radatz plays for the Red Sox, not the Pirates. You probably thought the Red Sox traded Radatz for Stuart, but it was Schwall, not Radatz. He's still with us, No. 17, not 26.

Well, I figured you must have made all the mistakes possible, but, boy! when I started reading the cover story I saw how wrong I was. What a poor selection of facts to cite! If you're doing an article on baseball's best relief pitcher, do it right. Like you forgot the time, just three weeks ago, when Radatz pitched six shutout innings against the Orioles, striking out 10, and then, two days later, 8? shutout innings against the Tigers, whiffing 11.

But maybe you're right. Two weeks ago he allowed an earned run, his first in 33 innings, struck out four men in three innings (giving him 71 strikeouts for 54 innings) and raised his earned run average from 0.88 to 1.00. Maybe the Red Sox should trade this guy to the Pirates for Roy Face. But the Pirates better throw in Cardwell, .Sisk, Schwall, McBean, Gibbon, Friend, Haddix, Law, Francis and Veale. And a little cash, too.
DANIEL GOLDFARB JR.
Brookline, Mass.

Sirs:
That does it! How can you possibly call Roy Face of the Pittsburgh Pirates the best reliever in baseball? Anyone who can lose two games in one day to the stumbling, bumbling New York Mets doesn't even have the right to call himself a pitcher, much less the best.
ROBERT BROOKS
Hillsdale, N.J.

Sirs:
It's bad enough to say something like that inside, but to put it on the cover of your magazine for all the world to laugh—well, you deserve it.

Here in Boston we have a monster named Dick Radatz who mashes the opposing players. But I know why he has not been on your cover—he is too big. You would have to double the size of an issue; so rather than go to the expense of all that, you put a little-type person, who fits easily, and then have some dolt write a perfectly horrible article about how this shrimp is the best around.

I'm a perfectly rational person, never excite easily, and calmly say that Dick Radatz could use EIRoy Face as a ball and throw him past the already baffled hitters in the American League.
DAVID BALKIN
Allston, Mass.

Sirs:
At one time Roy Face was baseball's best relief pitcher. But now let's face facts. Boston's Dick Radatz has a 6-1 record to Face's 2-5 and, even more important, his ERA is hovering around 1.00 while Face has an ERA of 4.00.
DANNY EDWARDS
Cincinnati

Continue Story
1 2 3 4