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A NEW SPORT: CAPTAIN-FISHING
Virginia Kraft
September 02, 1963
Sport-fishing skippers are lured into service by offers of houses, sports cars—and even marriage
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September 02, 1963

A New Sport: Captain-fishing

Sport-fishing skippers are lured into service by offers of houses, sports cars—and even marriage

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These fringe benefits can and often do include uniforms, hospitalization, insurance, paid vacations, travel and all expenses when away from home, Christmas and holiday bonuses, financial assistance with mortgages, school and medical bills, car loans and sometimes even the car. On top of such benefits are countless others less tangible but no less impressive: the glamour of an afternoon at the boss's pool, or an evening with the boss's wife at an exclusive island club, or just splitting a beer with the president of the biggest corporation in America, These repeated and sometimes intimate encounters with luxury, wealth and power—with a way of life normally limited to the very rich—are as much a part of the glamour of "going private" as the financial security of the job. It is not surprising that a few of the more impressionable young captains succumb to the unaccustomed grandeur, just as it is not entirely surprising that most of them look more like movie extras than fishing guides. And, after a day on the open sea under a warm tropical sun, it is not really so surprising that a few of the ladies in the fighting chairs find it more fun to angle for the captain—their own or somebody else's—than for the fish. This is all part of the sport.

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