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Knee action for a power play
Jack Nicklaus
September 16, 1963
One of the most overlooked sources of power in a golf swing is the knees, especially the right knee. The hips, knees and feet all work together in creating power, but the knees serve as the focal point. Here are a few things to consider on the practice tee if you are not getting the distance you think you should. For every shot except the very short ones, a line extending across the kneecaps should point at the target. As the club comes back, the left knee should turn in toward the right. Now the right knee becomes the critical point of the entire swing. It should be locked in position and not move at all during the back-swing. When it is braced in this fashion, the body is coiling like a spring around the knee. This firmness builds up power for the downswing. It also makes it impossible to lose power by swaying away from the ball. As the downswing starts, the strength contained by the right knee is abruptly-released by pushing off the inside of the right foot. This will cause the right knee to turn directly toward the target, which helps push the whole body, and the power in it, in the direction the ball is being hit. One word of caution. Before you look for such a source of additional power, you must have a well-disciplined basic swing.
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September 16, 1963

Knee Action For A Power Play

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One of the most overlooked sources of power in a golf swing is the knees, especially the right knee. The hips, knees and feet all work together in creating power, but the knees serve as the focal point. Here are a few things to consider on the practice tee if you are not getting the distance you think you should. For every shot except the very short ones, a line extending across the kneecaps should point at the target. As the club comes back, the left knee should turn in toward the right. Now the right knee becomes the critical point of the entire swing. It should be locked in position and not move at all during the back-swing. When it is braced in this fashion, the body is coiling like a spring around the knee. This firmness builds up power for the downswing. It also makes it impossible to lose power by swaying away from the ball. As the downswing starts, the strength contained by the right knee is abruptly-released by pushing off the inside of the right foot. This will cause the right knee to turn directly toward the target, which helps push the whole body, and the power in it, in the direction the ball is being hit. One word of caution. Before you look for such a source of additional power, you must have a well-disciplined basic swing.

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