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The annual rite of fall
Robert Creamer
September 16, 1963
As the season approaches for chopping off managers' heads, here is a list of those who are safe—and a few who might be wise to duck
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September 16, 1963

The Annual Rite Of Fall

As the season approaches for chopping off managers' heads, here is a list of those who are safe—and a few who might be wise to duck

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Gil Hodges (Senators): Team has improved under Gil, but managing a last-place team is like living on a volcano.

Harry Craft (Colts): Does competent job running Paul Richards' team. No reason for Harry to take blame for ninth place—except he is the manager.

Casey Stengel (Mets): Only one wolf howled, but he howled loud. Still, George Weiss would be crazy to fire the crowd-pleasing Casey.

REALLY ON THE SPOT:

Ed Lopat (Athletics): Good manager, did capable job with weak team. However, Charlie Finley is his boss, and Finley is a restless man.

Fred Hutchinson (Reds): One of most respected men in majors, but Reds had a very disappointing year.

Danny Murtaugh (Pirates): The same manager he was before his hitters were traded away, but Pirates have gone from pennant to eighth place since 1960.

Bill Rigney (Angels): Manager of the Year in 1962 when astounding Angels finished third. Now they're back near the bottom. Who do you think will be blamed? Bo Belinsky?

Billy Hitchcock (Orioles): Local press is on him, team has had two disappointing seasons in a row.

Of course, it is not inevitable that someone will be fired. There is a precedent for that. Not one single manager got fired in 1936.

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