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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 21, 1963
AFTERMATHSirs:On the sixth day of October, nineteen hundred and sixty-three, the New York Yankees rolled over and croaked—and Baseball's Babbling Brook (Mel Allen to you) ran dry!HENRY G. JACKSON JR.Quonochontaug, R.I.
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October 21, 1963

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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AFTERMATH
Sirs:
On the sixth day of October, nineteen hundred and sixty-three, the New York Yankees rolled over and croaked—and Baseball's Babbling Brook ( Mel Allen to you) ran dry!
HENRY G. JACKSON JR.
Quonochontaug, R.I.

Sirs:
Kudos to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED! Your World Series prediction and coverage were excellent. The Dodgers performed adroitly, thanks to Messrs. Koufax, Podres, Drysdale. Now what about some of your other prognostications? The Dallas Cowboys, for instance, who are 0-4 as of this writing?
JOE SULLIVAN
Philadelphia

Sirs:
Do your readers still think it would help baseball to switch the Yankees and the Mets (19TH HOLE, Sept. 30 et seq.)?
PETER SAMSON
Hempstead, N.Y.

Sirs:
The National League would only be giving away one second division club—and receiving another.
C.C.B. MOODY
Downey, Calif.

Sirs:
Reader R. Bruce Manwiller (19TH HOLE, Oct. 7) asked: "How many teams in the senior circuit possess three men who would be sure to break into the Yankee regular starting lineup?" How about Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale and Tommy Davis for a start? Throw in Podres and Skowron, and I'm afraid that the Yankee bench would be awfully crowded.
JACK D. CRAIG
New York City

Sirs:
Elston Howard, a very fine catcher, is the only Yankee that would make an all-star team in the National League.
GEORGE L. BAKER JR.
Dayton

Sirs:
Now that the Dodgers have proved that not only the lower rungs of the American League but also the Yankees are in danger of collapsing, may I suggest one more way of equalizing talent and eliminating the have/have not situation in the major leagues?

Make it mandatory for each team to designate annually three ballplayers who have each played in at least five innings of 75 games and a pitcher who has won at least six games during the previous season for assignment to a player pool. Choices would then be made in the reverse order of the team standings at the end of the season.

It might be even more interesting to have a two-league pool to introduce new faces. The last-place team of the league whose pennant winner loses the World Series would then choose first, followed by the last-place team in the alternate league, etc.

If enough players are not yielded by this plan, then the required number of games could be increased to 100 and the pitcher's wins to eight. By experience it should become easier to set limits that will achieve good balance in both leagues with eventual profit to all concerned. Amen.
LAWRENCE A. BLAZINA, M.D.
San Francisco

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