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SCOUTING REPORTS
October 28, 1963
This is a time of change for the NBA, and times of change are both tough and rewarding. It is going to be harder tow in this year as easy games become the exception rather than the rule. The stars of the past will find things more difficult because the stars of the future are both excellent and ambitious. These younger players can make a major difference in the standings, and veterans will have to really fight to keep previous winning teams on top. One of the powers, Los Angeles, should—nevertheless—prevail in the West. The other, Boston, could be upset in the East. Here are the teams, and men who hold the keys to their hopes.
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October 28, 1963

Scouting Reports

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NEW YORK
Though last again last year the Knickerbockers were first in attendance—which only shows how many basketball fanatics there are in New York, and how many tourists are determined to spend money. A winner in New York would be a gold mine for the NBA, but as sure as Madison Square Garden seats 18,000 and charges $5 tops, there can be no winner this year. There may never be a winner if the club management continues to mishandle and then sell top talent, as it sold Richie Guerin last week. The Knicks cannot win until they find an adequate center. The inadequate incumbents are Bob Nordmann, Gene Conley, Paul Hogue and Tom Hoover. They are equally bad. The Knicks did get one thing to boast about in the player draft, last year's top college star, Art Heyman. A back-court man, he is already the team's most interesting player. Another pleasant surprise is the improvement of second-year man John Rudometkin, who has finally adjusted to the shift from college pivot man to pro forward. Only 6 feet 6, Rudometkin still has a tough time underneath the basket, however. Johnny Green (18.1) is 6 feet 5 but a fabled jumper and should do better with more rest. Dave Budd is the reserve forward, while Tom Gola will see action in both the frontcourt and back-court. Heyman's partner at guard will be Al Butler, another improved player. The Knicks play a fluid, shifting game around the anonymous man in the middle. Coach Eddie Donovan would like them to run, but they do not get enough rebounds for that. The best that can be said for them is that with Heyman and Rudometkin on hand and Barry Kramer of NYU a possibility for next season, this losing year may be a building losing year.

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