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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 28, 1963
APES IN THE IVYSirs:Dick Kazmaier hits the spot in his Open Letter to a College President (Oct. 14), but not hard enough. Athletic "scholarships" are awarded and continued primarily for athletic performance of a certain level. Thus they make their recipients professional athletes, as I think the law, conscience and a sensitive Olympic committee will concur. If a group of sportsmen to whom the Olympics means more than a skirmish in the Cold War would sue next time a genuine amateur is kept off the U.S. squad by a paid ape, this problem could be brought into the open. In football it is finally getting through to the paying customer that the Big Ten kind of game is simply the bush league of pro ball; Ivy League football is a genuine college sport.PROFESSOR MICHAEL SCRIVEN Indiana University Bloomington, Ind.
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October 28, 1963

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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APES IN THE IVY
Sirs:
Dick Kazmaier hits the spot in his Open Letter to a College President (Oct. 14), but not hard enough. Athletic "scholarships" are awarded and continued primarily for athletic performance of a certain level. Thus they make their recipients professional athletes, as I think the law, conscience and a sensitive Olympic committee will concur. If a group of sportsmen to whom the Olympics means more than a skirmish in the Cold War would sue next time a genuine amateur is kept off the U.S. squad by a paid ape, this problem could be brought into the open. In football it is finally getting through to the paying customer that the Big Ten kind of game is simply the bush league of pro ball; Ivy League football is a genuine college sport.
PROFESSOR MICHAEL SCRIVEN
Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind.

Sirs:
I agree with Princeton's Dick Kazmaier in principle and I admire his school spirit, but I find his smug self-righteousness more than a little nauseating. Perhaps they will be doomed to utter failure, but I fear my three sons will have to survive in this cruel world without exposure to Old Nassau.
ROBERT JELINEK
Syracuse, N.Y.

WAXWORK
Sirs:
In SCORECARD ("Image Recaptured," Sept. 30) you mentioned that Mme. Tussaud's had abandoned a plan to model Sonny Liston.

I can assure you a fearsome, life-size model of Sonny is in there on display for any tourist, such as I, to see. It is standing right next to & petit Ingemar Johansson.
JIM COURTER
Durham, N.C.

?One model of Liston, made from photographs, is indeed on display (see right), but Mme. Tussaud's hoped Sonny would pose for a new effigy when he was in London. "His hands are quite fascinating," a spokesman said, "bigger than most people's feet. We couldn't find a suitable stand-in here."—ED.

INSIDE DOPE
Sirs:
The arguments about whether the first indoor football game was played in 1934 or 1935 are meaningless (19TH HOLE, Oct. 14), because the first indoor game was actually played even earlier. Temple University played it in Convention Hall in Atlantic City, N.J. around 1930. I believe their opponent was Penn Military College. There were six inches of dirt on the concrete floor, as it was being used for polo.
ERIC HEWITT
Fairfield, Conn.

Sirs:
Just to set the record straight about who invented indoor football, City College met New York Pharmacy in what was then the Dickel Riding Academy at 116th Street and 11th Avenue on January 12, 1900. The Beavers, then called the St. Nicks, won 25-0 behind the coaching of John F. Condon, the famous "Jafsie" of the Lindbergh kidnap case.
STEVE ABEL
New York City

Sirs:
There were several indoor games before 1934. In 1930 a regulation football field was set up in the Atlantic City Auditorium for a game between Lafayette and Washington and Jefferson. In 1890 Amos Alonzo Stagg brought a team from Springfield Training School to play against some All-Stars from Yale in New York's Madison Square Garden.
C. L. MAXEY
Webster Groves, Mo.

HELP WANTED
Sirs:
In your Sept. 30 issue you presented an article (Why Can't We Beat This Girl?) about the shortage of women in track and field. Your readers might be interested to know that it is against the regulations of Wyoming's High School Athletic Association for any girl in a public high school to compete against a girl from another school in the state, if she is representing her school. Consequently, we can't promote any competition outside of intramurals.
NONI DEARINGER
Laramie, Wyo.

?High school athletic associations in many other states—among them, Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Montana, Oregon, Utah and Wisconsin—have similar restrictions concerning inter-scholastic team competition for girls.—ED.

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