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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 04, 1963
DEATH SENTENCESirs:The line you guys employ never ceases to amaze me. You spin that moralizing nonsense about the beauty and truth of boxing (SCORECARD, Oct. 28), then you turn right around and itemize the terrible incidents leading up to the death of Ernie Knox.
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November 04, 1963

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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DEATH SENTENCE
Sirs:
The line you guys employ never ceases to amaze me. You spin that moralizing nonsense about the beauty and truth of boxing (SCORECARD, Oct. 28), then you turn right around and itemize the terrible incidents leading up to the death of Ernie Knox.

Maybe, as you say, politicians and editorialists know nothing about boxing, but, God save the mark, they probably do know what it means when a man is provoked and inflamed by a leering mob of sadists into beating another man to death. Your headline, This Death Might Kill Boxing, is the one encouraging aspect of your coverage of the death of Fighter Ernie Knox, and I, for one, hope prizefighting and your untenable position that boxing is "good sport"' go down together.
BEN ANDERS
Norwalk, Conn.

Sirs:
Bringing the Government into boxing would not solve a thing. You advocate this, saying that unless boxing is given a strong federal commissioner and soon, its prospects of survival are dim.
ARDEN J. SCHOEP
Nevada, Iowa

MAX
Sirs:
You people do little enough for us cat-lovers. At least you can show us a picture of the redoubtable Maximillian (SCORECARD, Oct. 28).
WILHELMINA HALL
Brooklyn

Sirs:
No "pure alley cat" is neuter. He's probably a pampered, perfumed puss who's never stalked an alley.
MILLIE ADAMS
New York City

CALL FOR A CUTTHROAT
Sirs:
No need to invent any fishy associates like Pickerel Puss for Dick Tracy's latest villain, Smallmouth Bass (SCORECARD, Oct. 21). We have one here in New Mexico's official state fish: Cutthroat Trout.
ARCH NAPIER
Albuquerque

HOT STOVE
Sirs:
It was to be expected that the fans and press would have a field day with the World Series debacle. The cries of National League superiority have risen again because the Yankees lost in four straight games—to a hot pitching staff while in the throes of a month-old batting slump. They were not bombed or destroyed—just beaten in four well-played, tight ballgames. It is not proof that "the Yankees arc in danger of collapsing" (19TH HOLE, Reader Blazina, Oct. 21) or that the Yankees would be a second division club in the National League (19TH HOLE, Reader Moody, Oct. 21). May I point out that the Yankees have defeated their National League opposition in nine of their last 13 meetings since 1949.

It is frequently pointed out that the National League is so evenly balanced that it crowns a new champ every year. I propose that these teams don't repeat because they lack depth and are dependent upon maximum performance from a minimum of men. The team that wins is the one whose few stars have great years, while a couple of lesser players go over their heads for one season. The following year these men return to their normal output, no one takes up the slack and the team fails to repeat. The Yankees win consistently because they have a great bench—someone always takes up the slack when the usual leaders fail—and it is this depth, in pitching as well as the regulars, which would make the Yankees consistent winners in any league.
KALMAN HELLER
Amherst, Mass.

Sirs:
Now that National League fans everywhere have witnessed a Yankee defeat in four games, they are telling everyone within shouting distance that the Yankees would not even finish in the first division in the "balanced" National League. The senior circuit should be so good.

The Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the New York Yankees in the World Series with pitching—phenomenal pitching—phenomenal even for the Dodgers. They also had fabulous luck when they needed it most. Roger Maris got hurt before he ever faced Don Drysdale. They were fortunate enough to score all their runs early, so their weak bench went relatively untaxed. Dodger luck was also exemplified by Tommy Davis' freak ground ball which led to the only run in game three. And, finally, God saw fit to turn the play that, in the words of Sandy Koufax, would have been the turning point of the entire Series into the three-base error which scaled Yankee doom.

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