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A crisp shot for soggy sand
Jack Nicklaus
November 11, 1963
Wet sand looks like hardened cement. If you are like most golfers, when you find your ball lying in a well-soaked bunker you feel you would as soon see it on a road. Actually, you should not be alarmed, for wet sand is easier to play out of than dry sand. The reason is that the water forms an extra cushion below the ball, and the club head bounces off this cushion. This is helpful, because on this shot the club head should not dig into the sand: it should skim through it just underneath the ball. At address, the ball should be positioned opposite the left foot and the blade of the sand wedge opened wide. The club should be swung back to the outside of the line to the target, but only about halfway back and on a low plane. On the downswing the club should enter the sand about an inch behind the ball. The open club face, the cushioning effect of the damp sand and the low plane of the swing are going to keep the club head from digging down too deeply. As a result, the ball will be simply nipped up and out of the sand. The longer the shot required, of course, the longer the backswing should be.
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November 11, 1963

A Crisp Shot For Soggy Sand

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Wet sand looks like hardened cement. If you are like most golfers, when you find your ball lying in a well-soaked bunker you feel you would as soon see it on a road. Actually, you should not be alarmed, for wet sand is easier to play out of than dry sand. The reason is that the water forms an extra cushion below the ball, and the club head bounces off this cushion. This is helpful, because on this shot the club head should not dig into the sand: it should skim through it just underneath the ball. At address, the ball should be positioned opposite the left foot and the blade of the sand wedge opened wide. The club should be swung back to the outside of the line to the target, but only about halfway back and on a low plane. On the downswing the club should enter the sand about an inch behind the ball. The open club face, the cushioning effect of the damp sand and the low plane of the swing are going to keep the club head from digging down too deeply. As a result, the ball will be simply nipped up and out of the sand. The longer the shot required, of course, the longer the backswing should be.

The ball is off the left heel. The club head is kept low and the eyes are on the point where it should enter the sand, an inch behind the ball.

The backswing should be kept short, not much past waist level, and the wrists held firm on the downswing to guarantee a firm shot.

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