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They met the challenges of a changing era
Robert Cantwell
November 11, 1963
Twenty-five college football players from the class of 1939 receive the annual Sports Illustrated Silver Anniversary Award for distinguished activities and mature citizenship in the years since they graduated
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November 11, 1963

They Met The Challenges Of A Changing Era

Twenty-five college football players from the class of 1939 receive the annual Sports Illustrated Silver Anniversary Award for distinguished activities and mature citizenship in the years since they graduated

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ROBERT W. GIBSON, Dartmouth
The center on a team that won seven of nine games in 1938, he became a naval aviator and saw extensive duty in the Pacific. After the war he and two classmates secured control of the Toro Manufacturing Corp., a Minneapolis lawn-mower concern that grew even faster than suburban grass. He became vice-president in charge of marketing.

MARSHALL GOLDBERG, Pittsburgh
One of football's great ballcarriers, he was twice an All-America for the Panthers. His 10-year career with the Chicago Cardinals was interrupted by service as an LST gunnery officer in the Pacific. He is now a vice-president of the Emerman Machinery Corp. in Chicago.

ROBERT L. GREEN JR., Harvard
Captain of the Crimson in 1938, he served with the Navy and returned to Cambridge, where he earned his doctorate at the Episcopal Theological School. Active in civic projects, he is now the rector of St. Matthew's Parish in Wilton, Conn.

ROBERT J. GREENEBAUM, Chicago
One of the stubborn contenders who held the teams together in the oh-so-awful final seasons of Big Ten football at Chicago, he served four years in naval aviation in the Pacific and returned to become president of Inland Steel Products Co. He has continued his University of Chicago ties by serving as a member of the executive committee of the Graduate School of Business.

DANIEL F. HANLEY, Bowdoin
Left end on one of his school's best teams—it lost only one game—he went on to Columbia, where he received his M.D. He was a medical officer in the China- Burma- India area. Now Bowdoin's college physician, he is noted for his research into the treatment and prevention of athletic injuries.

FRED W. HEITMANN JR., Northwestern
He was a first-string guard on the team that held powerful Michigan and Ohio State to scoreless ties. A teller, he returned to banking after three years in the Army, has since become president of Chicago's Northwest National Bank.

MARTIN F. HILFINGER, Hamilton
His 1938 team did not win a game, but Co-Captain Hilfinger made up for any athletic disappointments with his scholastic record. A Phi Beta Kappa, he went on to receive his M.D. summa cum laude at the Syracuse University College of Medicine. Following three years as a captain in the Army Medical Corps, he returned to Syracuse, where he now is on the staff of several hospitals, teaches and is involved in numerous cancer-research projects.

JOHN HLAVACEK, Carleton
A tackle on the field and a mathematician off, he went to north China in 1939 to teach English at the Fen-chow Mission School. In 1944 he found himself involved in a desperate effort to help Chinese refugees fleeing from the invading Japanese army. Trapped almost by accident in the swirl of world events, he decided to make them his business. A foreign correspondent, he now represents the National Broadcasting Company in the Caribbean.

JEROME H. HOLLAND, Cornell
An All-America end on a successful Cornell team, he became a yard director of personnel at the Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company in Chester, Pa. during the war. Getting a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, he began a distinguished career in education. He is president of Hampton Institute in Hampton, Va.

GILBERT W. HUMPHREY, Yale
Navy men saw plenty of him in 1938, when he threw a touchdown pass against them, then beat them with a field goal. The Navy then got him as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Hyman, a destroyer stationed in the Pacific. He joined the M. A. Hanna Company, is now its chairman.

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