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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 18, 1963
SEEING CRIMSONSirs:Oh, come on now, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Two years in a row with this nonsense about Harvard football is too much (Who Loves Harvard?, Nov. 4). The Johnnies are excited about football nowadays because they are winning, and they are winning because they are recruiting. It's that simple.
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November 18, 1963

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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SEEING CRIMSON
Sirs:
Oh, come on now, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Two years in a row with this nonsense about Harvard football is too much (Who Loves Harvard?, Nov. 4). The Johnnies are excited about football nowadays because they are winning, and they are winning because they are recruiting. It's that simple.

Last year your Cantab-oriented staff tried to persuade us that the Crimson athletes were the smoothest combination of intellect and beef ever gathered together in one locker room. This year we are told that tradition is something of which Harvard has "a great deal more than anyone else." Well, the article is about football, and we'd suggest that you check the alltime records of Harvard football teams against those made by men in Yale blue. They might teach you something about tradition.
PAUL E. STEIGER
WILLIAM R. SCHULTZ
New Haven, Conn.

Sirs:
Alfred Wright's story was not only an admirable commentary on the football festivities at the Harvard "coliseum" but also a remarkable study of her fair-haired gladiators. Strange must be the mannerisms of the Crimson gentlemen who preserve their Hollywood looks and best friendship even on the field. This must be part of Harvard's long and glorious tradition in the game of football.

We seem to recall a venerable institution in Connecticut that boasts a more tangible tradition, a better football record through the years, and such names as Amos Alonzo Stagg, Walter Camp and Albie Booth, men whose ties did not have to blow unnoticed over their shoulders.

How nice it is to hear that the team has requited the love of the student body—and that the Cliffies are still fighting Harvard fiercely.

What hath John Harvard wrought?
WILLIAM A. BURCK III
PETER R. McCOMBS
F. BRADFORD NIEBLING
New Haven, Conn.

Sirs:
Apparently the Harvard definition of maturity includes the chanting of "the ref beats his wife" and the unsportsmanlike waving of white handkerchiefs at the conclusion of the game. It is certainly a paradox that Dartmouth can be judged uncouth when one compares these manifestations of immaturity with the proud acceptance of defeat by the Dartmouth students.

We shall be able to bear the burden of this loss of ephemeral grandeur because we know that we possess something that transcends athletic accomplishment, a love for our school. For indeed, sir, who does love Harvard?

Wah-hoo-wah!
ROBERT D. RESNIKOFF
KENNETH R. ELLIS
Hanover, N.H.

Sirs:
I think most Dartmouth men would like it known that we consider your article Who Loves Harvard? extremely unfair. Wright's biased viewpoint disturbed us "fiercely," and, although you are considered the vanguard of taste and propriety in the sporting world, what you said about Harvard was downright nasty They may have beaten us, broken our winning streak and our hearts, but they certainly don't deserve such a literary drubbing.
PHILIP H. WADE
Hanover, N.H.

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