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SMART MOVES BY A MASTER OF DECEPTION
Frank Ramsey
December 09, 1963
Frank Ramsey once was fouled so quickly after coming into a game that his Celtic teammate, Bill Russell, commented, "Frank was still so cold he had to warm up before shooting his free throw." No one has ever been better at the art of suckering an opponent into committing fouls than this former All-America from Kentucky. Ramsey capitalizes on the fact that, by its rules, basketball is a non-body-contact sport. When contact occurs—even accidentally—the chances are a foul will be called. Free throws account for some 20% of points scored, so it obviously is more blessed to be fouled than to foul. While it is both efficient and ethical to lure an opponent into committing a foul, Ramsey takes this strategy even further, into the realm of gamesmanship—which may affront some concepts of fair play but is accepted practice in the most skilled strata of the sport. The spectator's appreciation will be enhanced by Ramsey's revelations on the following pages.
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December 09, 1963

Smart Moves By A Master Of Deception

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The underhand shot is still the classic maneuver for drawing a foul. Anytime I am near the basket and am fouled just before I shoot, I flick the ball up as fast as I can. It may look enough like a legitimate shot for me to get two free throws instead of one. All the pros know about this sort of thing. They know what I've been getting away with, without having to see drawings. But it isn't easy to combat these moves when they're done properly.

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