SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 09, 1963
BLOOD, SWEAT AND UNIFORMSSirs:May I be the first to commend Rex Lardner for his informative story relating the pressing research on football gear conducted under the direction of Dr. Donald K. Mathews of OSU (The Uniform Can Be a Death Trap, Nov. 25). My suggestion would be to reprint this article and to assign it to all high school and college coaches for distribution among the players. Their timely suggestions may well prevent any more of these needless deaths, provoked by objectionable methods of training.JON W. HOAG III Georgetown, Ky.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
December 09, 1963

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

BLOOD, SWEAT AND UNIFORMS
Sirs:
May I be the first to commend Rex Lardner for his informative story relating the pressing research on football gear conducted under the direction of Dr. Donald K. Mathews of OSU (The Uniform Can Be a Death Trap, Nov. 25). My suggestion would be to reprint this article and to assign it to all high school and college coaches for distribution among the players. Their timely suggestions may well prevent any more of these needless deaths, provoked by objectionable methods of training.
JON W. HOAG III
Georgetown, Ky.

Sirs:
Your staff, especially Gay Flood and Rex Lardner, is to be congratulated for reporting with such clarity and accuracy.
DONALD K. MATHEWS
Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

OLD AND SWEET
Sirs:
Huston Horn's article, New Sugar in an Old State (Nov. 18), was fine in all but one respect. Not to have recognized Vermont's third largest ski area, Killington, was a gross oversight.

Six ski areas in Vermont have an unusual relationship with the state. The foresightedness of Vermont's Department of Forests and Parks has encouraged private investment at Killington and other ski locations through long-term property leases. As a result, the state received $50,000 in fees last season from Killington alone. Private capital has invested more than $3.5 million in the area in five years of development.

On a more immediate economic scene, Killington will employ 205 local people this winter, overshadowing last year's payroll of $250,000. In addition, 55 area ski lodges and motels and many allied businesses will again operate at capacity because of the development's attractiveness to winter patrons. Last year these same enterprises grossed over $3 million because of the impact of this area's phenomenal growth.
ROBERT H. PERRY
New York City

Sirs:
Your article on the Tyrol (Olympic Winter in the Tyrol, Nov. 25) states, "Here one may get the feeling that skiing is very old—until its brief 40 years are measured against Tyrolean antiquities" like a 12th century castle.

Forty years, indeed! The oldest pair of skis found in Finland are 4,000 years old—yes, 4,000 years old. And as far back as 1858 ski races in Scandinavia have drawn crowds of 30,000 spectators.

The Middle European hotelkeeping racket that has been sold to Americans as skiing is nothing more than a vaudeville show outdoors. Skiing is a means of transportation nearly as old as running or swimming.

The so-called Alpine events should not even be called skiing. They would be more correctly labeled as acrobatics and stunts in snow. The only events that should be dignified with the name of skiing should be the Nordic events. Let the yodeling waiters turn their somersaults in the circus, where they belong!

Anyway, that was a stupid statement about skiing being 40 years old.
J. R. JOHNSON
Los Angeles

Continue Story
1 2 3