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NEW MARKS FOR OLD PROS AND YOUNG AMATEURS
January 06, 1964
1 Throughout the world of sport, athletes spent the past year doing things no one had been able to accomplish before. Cleveland Fullback Jimmy Brown (right), pro football's finest runner, gained 1,863 yards on the ground, a new alltime season high. And for New York bald old Y.A. Tittle threw a record 36 touchdown passes while setting a new career mark for total pass completions of 1,971.
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January 06, 1964

New Marks For Old Pros And Young Amateurs

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1 Throughout the world of sport, athletes spent the past year doing things no one had been able to accomplish before. Cleveland Fullback Jimmy Brown (right), pro football's finest runner, gained 1,863 yards on the ground, a new alltime season high. And for New York bald old Y.A. Tittle threw a record 36 touchdown passes while setting a new career mark for total pass completions of 1,971.

2 Mary Mairs is the perfect equestrienne—pretty, genteel and skillful. At the Pan American Games she defeated both male and female competitors to win the gold medal for individual performance.

3 At 14, Billy Spencer of Sarasota, Fla. was the youngest member of the U.S. Water Ski Team. He was also the best, leading the team to the world championship and himself taking the all-round title.

4 Blonde, blue-eyed Mickey Wright won 14 of the 29 golf tournaments she entered this year. "It's a case of if I win, well," she says, "I was supposed to. If I don't, it's 'What's the matter with Mickey Wright?' "

5 Last season, 18-year-old Henry Sprague III was the North American Junior Sailing champion. Moving up in 1963, he took the North American single-handed title, then national honors in the Finn class.

6 Two and a half years ago a cute art student named Anne Batterson tried sport parachuting for the first time. By last fall, she was U.S. women's champion and winner against 16 nations in Yugoslavia.

7 Detroit long had treated auto racing as tempting but not quite respectable until Ford's Lee Iacocca put his company onto the track, swept U.S. stock events and changed the design of Indianapolis cars.

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