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THIS PITCHER MAY NEED RELIEF
Jim Brosnan
March 16, 1964
Never popular with club owners because he lifted baseball's flannel curtain in his irreverent books (The Long Season and Pennant Race, both bestsellers) and in his magazine articles, Pitcher-Author Jim Brosnan passed from the Chicago Cubs to the St. Louis Cardinals to the Cincinnati Reds and, quite early last season, to the Chicago White Sox. This winter, at the age of 34—which is late middle age as ballplayers go—Brosnan seemed near the end of the major league trail. What follows here is his own account, sometimes funny and sometimes bitter, of his contract negotiations with the White Sox—negotiations that have left Brosnan, temporarily at least, unemployed.
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March 16, 1964

This Pitcher May Need Relief

Never popular with club owners because he lifted baseball's flannel curtain in his irreverent books (The Long Season and Pennant Race, both bestsellers) and in his magazine articles, Pitcher-Author Jim Brosnan passed from the Chicago Cubs to the St. Louis Cardinals to the Cincinnati Reds and, quite early last season, to the Chicago White Sox. This winter, at the age of 34—which is late middle age as ballplayers go—Brosnan seemed near the end of the major league trail. What follows here is his own account, sometimes funny and sometimes bitter, of his contract negotiations with the White Sox—negotiations that have left Brosnan, temporarily at least, unemployed.

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"That's not free," I said. "I'd be doing your job. You get paid for selling ballplayers."

"Well, there's nothing further to discuss," Short said. "Goodby."

"Who discussed?" I said. "All I did was listen."

I hung up the phone.

"Now I'm a general manager," I told my wife. "It's the first time I ever heard of cattle being told it's O.K. to go ahead and sell themselves as long as they turn the proceeds over to the rancher."

"I think you're getting the old squeeze play," Anne said. "What can they do if you don't sign?"

"Sit on their hands until March 11. Then they can sit on me. If I don't sign by then, the contract is automatically renewed on their terms."

"What kind of business is that?" she said.

"It's all part of the game, honey," I said.

"When are we leaving for Florida?" my daughter asked.

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