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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
March 16, 1964
PAST, PRESENT, FUTURESirs:You gave Cassius Clay something of a chance to win and he capitalized on it. I suppose 99% of the nation's boxing experts told us Clay wouldn't survive the national anthem. Those of us who have followed Clay felt he would whip Liston as far back as his fight with Lavorante. But do you think the sportswriters are willing to eat crow? They are not. Some even had the effrontery to suggest that the fight was a setup. Many belittled Liston for retiring in his corner. What can boxing do to win? If Liston had pulverized Clay in one, they would have yelled, "What did I tell you?" If Liston had continued with an injured arm and suffered a serious or fatal injury, these same writers would have asked for an end to the brutal sport. Clay fought a smart, courageous fight—the only kind he could have fought if he was to survive the early rounds. So what do they write? On the strength of one fight, they call Liston washed up. Overrated. Not one has speculated what Liston might do in a return. Liston is still one heck of a fighter, and he's not that slow. Clay is just exceptionally fast.
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March 16, 1964

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
Let's see now. Clay will give Liston a rematch, only "I don't think I'll fight again this year because of the income-tax situation and the Army draft call and all that." So in 1965 Liston beats Clay, who will have a rematch clause (of course) in his contract. And then in 1966 Clay beats Liston in another stunning upset, but fortunately Liston has a rematch clause and....

All great fun and I look forward to seeing the fights, provided boxing hasn't petered out in the meantime, but what a pity it won't decide who's really the best heavyweight in the world. You see, somehow poor Eddie ("Bridesmaid") Machen—who's looking better than ever these days—gets left out of the picture. By the time he gets a crack at the title he'll be too old to fight anymore.
ROGER PROULX
Birmingham, Mich.

COLD HEART
Sirs:
Surely you must realize by now how closely bridge idiots like myself are following your wonderful articles (A New Approach to Bridge, Feb. 17 et seq.). However, the six-spade hand shown in Part 4 (Tricks of My Trade, March 9) is a laydown even with the brilliant opening lead of the heart 6. Declarer (East) goes up with the ace of hearts, draws three rounds of trumps, plays three rounds of clubs (discarding his last heart on the queen of clubs), takes three top diamond tricks and concedes the jack of spades. I'd shoot my bride if she blew this one.
TOM BURNS
Wilmette, Ill.

?Don't shoot her; deal her the right hand instead:

NORTH

[— of Spades]
[9 of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[10 of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[5 of Diamonds]
[4 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]
[Jack of Clubs]
[10 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]

EAST

[Ace of Spades]
[King of Spades]
[Queen of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[6 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[7 of Hearts]
[5 of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[King of Diamonds]
[King of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]

SOUTH

[Jack of Spades]
[9 of Spades]
[5 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[King of Hearts]
[6 of Hearts]
[9 of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]
[7 of Diamonds]
[5 of Clubs]
[4 of Clubs]
[3 of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]

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