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PLAYER OF THE WEEK
May 04, 1964
Pitcher Ken Johnson of Houston is a quiet, philosophical man. His idea of having a wild time is to talk in a Donald Duck voice, something he once did during a radio interview. Johnson's record for the past two seasons is 18-33, good for a Houston pitcher, but it might have been better if his team had been able to score a little. A dozen times he lost because his teammates were shut out, but Johnson felt confident the breaks would change. Last week they did, in an uneven sort of way. On the night before he was to have his aching elbow examined by the team physician, Johnson pitched a no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in Houston. But Johnson did not win. For the unlucky 13th time, his teammates failed to score, and because of two ninth-inning errors, one his own, Johnson and Houston lost 1-0. Pitchers have lost nine other no-hit games, all in extra innings. Johnson became the first pitcher in the history of baseball to lose a no-hitter in nine innings. His was the ninth no-hitter in the major leagues in less than 24 months and the seventh one in a night game. Fans from all over the country called, many not knowing whether to congratulate or console him. But Johnson, far from feeling discouraged, was almost buoyant: "If I had won the game, people would soon have forgotten all about it. This way they'll talk about it for years." Then, remembering his medical appointment, Johnson told the doctor, "I think we'd better leave my arm as it is."
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May 04, 1964

Player Of The Week

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Pitcher Ken Johnson of Houston is a quiet, philosophical man. His idea of having a wild time is to talk in a Donald Duck voice, something he once did during a radio interview. Johnson's record for the past two seasons is 18-33, good for a Houston pitcher, but it might have been better if his team had been able to score a little. A dozen times he lost because his teammates were shut out, but Johnson felt confident the breaks would change. Last week they did, in an uneven sort of way. On the night before he was to have his aching elbow examined by the team physician, Johnson pitched a no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in Houston. But Johnson did not win. For the unlucky 13th time, his teammates failed to score, and because of two ninth-inning errors, one his own, Johnson and Houston lost 1-0. Pitchers have lost nine other no-hit games, all in extra innings. Johnson became the first pitcher in the history of baseball to lose a no-hitter in nine innings. His was the ninth no-hitter in the major leagues in less than 24 months and the seventh one in a night game. Fans from all over the country called, many not knowing whether to congratulate or console him. But Johnson, far from feeling discouraged, was almost buoyant: "If I had won the game, people would soon have forgotten all about it. This way they'll talk about it for years." Then, remembering his medical appointment, Johnson told the doctor, "I think we'd better leave my arm as it is."

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