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Words will never hurt them
Charles Goren
May 11, 1964
The six players on the U.S. women's Olympiad team have experience and skill, but most important of all, they get along with each other
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May 11, 1964

Words Will Never Hurt Them

The six players on the U.S. women's Olympiad team have experience and skill, but most important of all, they get along with each other

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WEST

PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS

NORTH

2 [Diamond]
4 N.T.
6 [Spade]
PASS

EAST

DOUBLE
PASS
DOUBLE

You can hardly blame East for being astounded that there should be a powerhouse two-club bid out against her hand. She inquired what South's bid meant, was told that it was forcing to two no trump, and then she doubled. South decided that the opponents probably had the better of the high cards, and her four-spade jump was largely preemptive. But North read it as showing some kind of superslam try. Since she had already shown a poor hand by her diamond response, she promoted the value of her king and her singleton and asked about aces. South meant her five-club response as a sign-off, but North thought it showed all four aces—as normally it would. Therefore she pushed on to six spades which East doubled. Mrs. Rebner lost only a club and a diamond trick for minus 200.

At the other table, with Muriel Kaplan and Jan Stone as West and East, the bidding was:

SOUTH

2 [Spade]
4 [Spade]
PASS

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