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A roundup of the sports information of the week
May 11, 1964
BASKETBALL—The U.S. national team, which included five Olympians, ended a disastrous two-week tour of Russia with an 87-66 win over Georgia, its third in eight games against Soviet teams. In the six previous years of U.S.-U.S.S.R. competition, the Americans had never been beaten in Russia.
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May 11, 1964

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASKETBALL—The U.S. national team, which included five Olympians, ended a disastrous two-week tour of Russia with an 87-66 win over Georgia, its third in eight games against Soviet teams. In the six previous years of U.S.- U.S.S.R. competition, the Americans had never been beaten in Russia.

BOWLING—After 65 days of competition among more than 20,000 bowlers, the $330,262 American Bowling Congress tournament in Oakland, Calif. finally came to a close. BILLY HARDWICK of San Mateo, Calif. was the only double champion, taking both the classic singles and the all-events titles. The other classic division winners were the ST. LOUIS FALSTAFFS in the team competition, and BOB STRAMPE and HAL JOLLEY of Detroit in the doubles. In the regular division the all-events title went to LES ZIKES of Chicago, while his Old Fitzgerald teammate, JIM STEFANICH of Joliet, Ill., won the singles. Truck-farming brothers PAT and TONY RUSSO of Teaneck, N.J. finished first in the doubles, and the 300 BOWL of Pontiac, Mich. gained the team championship.

BOXING—First-ranked Flyweight HIROYUKI EBIHARA of Japan earned a probable title match with Pone Kingpetch of Thailand later this year when he won a split decision over Mexico's Efren Torres in a 12-round elimination fight at the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles.

GOLF—Successfully defending his title, JACK NICKLAUS (see page 80) took the lead on the third round and went on to victory in the $65,000 Tournament of Champions in Las Vegas, becoming the first double winner on the PGA circuit this year (he also won the Phoenix Open in February).

"It gives me great pleasure that it was a friend of mine who beat me. You wouldn't want to lose to just anyone," said Defending Champion Billy Joe Patton in Pinehurst, N.C., after losing the North and South Amateur Championship 3 and 2 to DALE MOREY of High Point, N.C., his former neighbor and Walker Cup teammate. Patton had won 19 straight matches and was trying for his third consecutive victory in the tournament.

Competing in a field of 104 amateurs and professionals, Los Angeles Pro PETE BROWN, 29, shot a seven-under-par 280 for 72 holes and became the first Negro to win the $20,000 Waco Turner Open in Burneyville, Okla. (see page 28).

The temperature was in the 90s in Alexandria, La., but MICKEY WRIGHT coolly stroked a five-under-par 67 on the final round to take the $8,000 LPGA Clifford Ann Creed Invitational by a six-stroke margin over Runner-up Kathy Cornelius. The tournament's namesake finished a disappointing 14th.

HARNESS RACING—Post Rail Farms' 3-year-old colt IRON RAIL ($12.30), driven by Stanley Dancer, finished half a length ahead of Red Carpet to win the $37,150 Commodore Pace at Roosevelt Raceway, his third straight victory of the season.

HORSE RACING—E.P. Taylor's NORTHERN DANCER ($8.80), ridden by Bill Hartack, won the $156,800 Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs see page 22). The Canadian-bred colt set a new Derby record of 2:00 for the mile-and-a-quarter distance as he edged favorite Hill Rise, winner of the Derby Trial earlier in the week, by a neck.

At Churchill Downs the previous day, Mrs. W.R. Hawn's BLUE NORTHER ($3.20), Willie Shoemaker aboard, won the $47,975 Kentucky Oaks, one of the oldest American stakes races for 3-year-old fillies, for her fifth straight victory of the season.

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