SI Vault
 
START
John Underwood
May 18, 1964
A slow beginner by international standards, Hayes (third from right) Is third in fact coming out of blocks at Atlanta. But he accelerates rapidly (right to left below) and is alone at the finish.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 18, 1964

Start

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

A slow beginner by international standards, Hayes (third from right) Is third in fact coming out of blocks at Atlanta. But he accelerates rapidly (right to left below) and is alone at the finish.

25 yards (3 seconds). This is the slowest portion of Hayes's race. Like 1956 Olympian Bobby Morrow, he does not reach real speed until 20 yards out.

50 yards (2.2 seconds). Adjusting stride after initial burst, Hayes settles into a fast float. According to San Jose State Coach Bud Winter, who has made special study, this is typical of best-trained sprinters.

75 yards (1.9 seconds). Hayes accelerates again. Despite wobbling gait, he is now traveling 26.9 mph, probably the highest speed ever attained in the 100.

100 yards (2.1 seconds). Hayes is famous for his kick at end. Actually, it is not as fast as has been imagined but only seems so because weaker opponents have tailed off.

1