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PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Peter Carry
July 27, 1964
First Baseman Ron Fairly of the Los Angeles Dodgers is usually called a money player. When Fairly hits, something he does in unpredictable fits and starts, he likes to do it with men on base. Although Fairly was playing semipro baseball at the age of 11, he did not really appreciate the significance of what he was doing until a 1953 conversation with Carl Furillo. "When you look at those base runners," Furillo told the $75,000 bonus baby, "forget that they're men. Each one is a dollar sign. The more dollars you knock in, the more money it'll put in your pocket." Last season Fairly could have taught his old mentor a few things about men-on-base hitting. The southern California redhead hit only .212 with the bases empty but .341 with men on and filled a key role in the Dodgers' pennant-winning drive. This year the Dodgers were fighting to stay out of the cellar over the first two months of the season and Fairly was hitting at subbasement level, .219. Last Friday they moved over the .500 mark for the first time since Opening Day, with Ron Fairly leading the surge. Since mid-June he has turned around two of the numbers in his average to read .291, and has been knocking in a run a game. Last week, as the Dodgers appeared ready for a run at the top, Fairly averaged .393 and had 11 of the Dodgers' 44 RBIs, including a game-winning home run against the Cubs that came, strangely enough, with the bases empty.
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July 27, 1964

Player Of The Week

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First Baseman Ron Fairly of the Los Angeles Dodgers is usually called a money player. When Fairly hits, something he does in unpredictable fits and starts, he likes to do it with men on base. Although Fairly was playing semipro baseball at the age of 11, he did not really appreciate the significance of what he was doing until a 1953 conversation with Carl Furillo. "When you look at those base runners," Furillo told the $75,000 bonus baby, "forget that they're men. Each one is a dollar sign. The more dollars you knock in, the more money it'll put in your pocket." Last season Fairly could have taught his old mentor a few things about men-on-base hitting. The southern California redhead hit only .212 with the bases empty but .341 with men on and filled a key role in the Dodgers' pennant-winning drive. This year the Dodgers were fighting to stay out of the cellar over the first two months of the season and Fairly was hitting at subbasement level, .219. Last Friday they moved over the .500 mark for the first time since Opening Day, with Ron Fairly leading the surge. Since mid-June he has turned around two of the numbers in his average to read .291, and has been knocking in a run a game. Last week, as the Dodgers appeared ready for a run at the top, Fairly averaged .393 and had 11 of the Dodgers' 44 RBIs, including a game-winning home run against the Cubs that came, strangely enough, with the bases empty.

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