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'I MANAGED GOOD, BUT BOY DID THEY PLAY BAD'
Gilbert Rogin
August 17, 1964
For 11 years Rocky Bridges played (more or less) for seven major league teams and he always got more laughs than hits. This summer he is making his managerial debut with the San Jose Bees. Rocky says he was sent down to learn the pitfalls of managing, but he was all ready with a quick alibi: 'I MANAGED GOOD, BUT BOY DID THEY PLAY BAD'
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August 17, 1964

'i Managed Good, But Boy Did They Play Bad'

For 11 years Rocky Bridges played (more or less) for seven major league teams and he always got more laughs than hits. This summer he is making his managerial debut with the San Jose Bees. Rocky says he was sent down to learn the pitfalls of managing, but he was all ready with a quick alibi: 'I MANAGED GOOD, BUT BOY DID THEY PLAY BAD'

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"Cab," said Coutts.

"Stop by the office later and I'll reimburse you for your cab fare," Jack said. "Unless you want it in stock certificates," he added hopefully.

"No game Monday, Jack?" Rocky asked.

"No."

"Roller derby?"

"Monday night's usually the roller derby," Jack explained. "It packs them in. No, Rock, it's an off night. The stadium's empty, but they're not used to us playing on Monday—or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. But Monday's bad. Well, I better be off. I got to check the downtown ticket locations."

This was a joke. There are no downtown ticket locations in San Jose.

There was no batting practice that night for the Bees or their opponents, the Modesto Colts, as the field was being used first for a Pony League game and then for a Little League game. "You know what the Little League is?" Rocky said, watching the kids play. "Something to keep the parents off the street. I bet you don't know what's the first question Little Leaguers always ask me. 'How much money do you make?' "

After infield practice Rocky joined his troops for a supper of hot dogs and Cokes at a concession stand. Then the Bees went out and beat the Colts 18-0. The first man dressed was Vic LaRose, a utility infielder. Two nights before, when the Bees lost 1-0, LaRose had finally gotten into the game as a pinch runner in the bottom of the ninth but had been stranded on first. He was the first man dressed then, too.

"He do get dressed remarkable quick," Larry had said when LaRose came in for his watch and wallet.

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