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PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Peter Carry
August 24, 1964
Unlike many of his colleagues in major league front offices, the Philadelphia Phillies' General Manager John Quinn is no showman. He does not play the role of the riverboat gambler, or the wheeler-dealer, or the circus ringmaster. He does, nevertheless, do his job—building winning teams—exceptionally well. Eight years ago, when Quinn's young Milwaukee team was driving for a pennant, he brought in an aging second baseman to shore up his infield and add some experience to his club. That player, Red Sehoendienst, was a major cog in the Braves' pennants of 1957 and 1958. Two weeks ago Quinn provided a similar injection of talent and experience for his high-flying Phillies; he traded for veteran right-handed slugger Frank Thomas of the New York Mets to make up for the Phils' lack of right-handed power. The formula is working again. In nine games with Philadelphia, Thomas has hit .378, with 14 hits, including two homers, five doubles and 14 RBIs. Since Frank joined the Phillies, they have won eight of nine and their lead in the pennant race has jumped from 1� to four games. Thomas has hit and driven in runs in all but two of these games. After 12 frustrating years, mostly in the second division, he is hitting as if there is a World Series check on each pitch. Even when the trade was just a rumor, Thomas said, "I know I can help the Phillies win the pennant." Frank was not the only one who knew it; this is John Quinn's kind of show.
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August 24, 1964

Player Of The Week

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Unlike many of his colleagues in major league front offices, the Philadelphia Phillies' General Manager John Quinn is no showman. He does not play the role of the riverboat gambler, or the wheeler-dealer, or the circus ringmaster. He does, nevertheless, do his job—building winning teams—exceptionally well. Eight years ago, when Quinn's young Milwaukee team was driving for a pennant, he brought in an aging second baseman to shore up his infield and add some experience to his club. That player, Red Sehoendienst, was a major cog in the Braves' pennants of 1957 and 1958. Two weeks ago Quinn provided a similar injection of talent and experience for his high-flying Phillies; he traded for veteran right-handed slugger Frank Thomas of the New York Mets to make up for the Phils' lack of right-handed power. The formula is working again. In nine games with Philadelphia, Thomas has hit .378, with 14 hits, including two homers, five doubles and 14 RBIs. Since Frank joined the Phillies, they have won eight of nine and their lead in the pennant race has jumped from 1� to four games. Thomas has hit and driven in runs in all but two of these games. After 12 frustrating years, mostly in the second division, he is hitting as if there is a World Series check on each pitch. Even when the trade was just a rumor, Thomas said, "I know I can help the Phillies win the pennant." Frank was not the only one who knew it; this is John Quinn's kind of show.

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