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PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Peter Carry
September 14, 1964
Milwaukee Outfielder Rico Carty has just one ambition: he simply wants to be "hoppy." It looks like the 25-year-old Dominican has already reached his goal, because right now he has every reason to be the floppiest player in the National League. Carty came up to the Braves this spring after switching from boxing to baseball and having four outstanding seasons in the minors as a catcher and second baseman. The Braves were already well supplied at those positions, so Manager Bobby Bragan moved Carty to the outfield. Since his fielding was, at best, amusing, Rico sat on the bench, waiting for a ticket to Mudville. But one day in June, Carty got a chance to play and made his mark with a two-run homer in his first game. He has not stopped hitting since. His fielding, thanks to the constant attentions of Manager Bragan, has so improved that his adoring fans, who congregate in the left-field bleachers, compare him to Henry Aaron, the king. The comparison is an apt one. Last week, as Carty hit .524, he pulled his season's average up to .327, second best in the National League and one point better than Aaron—his roommate, batting coach and hero. Although not quite as powerful as Aaron, Carty has the same kind of quick wrists with which to snap his bat. He hits all sorts of pitches to all fields—and hard. He has already flicked those wrists for 23 doubles and 16 homers—the kind of hitting which makes both Rico and all of Milwaukee very hoppy.
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September 14, 1964

Player Of The Week

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Milwaukee Outfielder Rico Carty has just one ambition: he simply wants to be "hoppy." It looks like the 25-year-old Dominican has already reached his goal, because right now he has every reason to be the floppiest player in the National League. Carty came up to the Braves this spring after switching from boxing to baseball and having four outstanding seasons in the minors as a catcher and second baseman. The Braves were already well supplied at those positions, so Manager Bobby Bragan moved Carty to the outfield. Since his fielding was, at best, amusing, Rico sat on the bench, waiting for a ticket to Mudville. But one day in June, Carty got a chance to play and made his mark with a two-run homer in his first game. He has not stopped hitting since. His fielding, thanks to the constant attentions of Manager Bragan, has so improved that his adoring fans, who congregate in the left-field bleachers, compare him to Henry Aaron, the king. The comparison is an apt one. Last week, as Carty hit .524, he pulled his season's average up to .327, second best in the National League and one point better than Aaron—his roommate, batting coach and hero. Although not quite as powerful as Aaron, Carty has the same kind of quick wrists with which to snap his bat. He hits all sorts of pitches to all fields—and hard. He has already flicked those wrists for 23 doubles and 16 homers—the kind of hitting which makes both Rico and all of Milwaukee very hoppy.

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