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Surprise, along came McDonald
September 21, 1964
Circumstances that give the University of Idaho potentially the best college fullback in the country are related directly to a day three years ago when Coach Ralph Tate left Alamogordo. N. Mex. to take over the high school team in Caldwell, Idaho. Tate was happy to come to Caldwell but sad—so sad—to leave behind a big, fast fullback named Ray McDonald. McDonald was equally heartbroken to see his coach go. So, came registration day at Caldwell High School, and surprise, surprise, there was Ray McDonald standing in line. The lines in Tate's face were merged into one titanic grin.
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September 21, 1964

Surprise, Along Came Mcdonald

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Circumstances that give the University of Idaho potentially the best college fullback in the country are related directly to a day three years ago when Coach Ralph Tate left Alamogordo. N. Mex. to take over the high school team in Caldwell, Idaho. Tate was happy to come to Caldwell but sad—so sad—to leave behind a big, fast fullback named Ray McDonald. McDonald was equally heartbroken to see his coach go. So, came registration day at Caldwell High School, and surprise, surprise, there was Ray McDonald standing in line. The lines in Tate's face were merged into one titanic grin.

They stayed that way for two seasons as McDonald became All-Idaho fullback. Then Ray McDonald graduated to the University of Idaho and Coach Dee Andros. "In my 14 years of watching high school athletes I never saw a better college prospect," says Andros.

Andros might have added that McDonald is so big (6 feet 4, 230 pounds) that he is rarely stopped by as few as two tacklers. Little ripples of alarm have been emanating from every school Idaho plays in the next three years. Against Washington and Washington State, freshman McDonald bucked more than 200 yards. He isn't likely to Hunk out either. Only a C student in high school and a struggler his first semester at Idaho, McDonald confounded himself and everyone else by making an even B average last semester. He did it by confining nonfootball activities "strictly to the books and music." After college, he wants to play pro ball. Several scouts already consider him one of the nation's best running backs.

No other sophomore in the West is so much the core of his team as McDonald, but others come close. Oregon State's Paul Brothers, whose high school statistics resemble those of Terry Baker and Mel Renfro, seems ready to displace a senior quarterback (Gordon Queen) who last year led the nation in touchdown passes. USC Safety-Quarterback Rod Sherman, Washington End Dave Williams, Utah State Quarterback Ron Edwards and Cal Halfback Lloyd Reist are other names that will be heard often.

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