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He doesn't drag them, he scatters them
September 21, 1964
Stew Williams, Bowling Green's fullback, has exceptional balance for a 230-pounder (he's six feet tall), runs the 100 in 10.1 and is strong and aggressive. "When he hits the line he doesn't drag people, he just scatters them," says Freshman Coach Jim Ruehl. Varsity Coach Doyt Perry, a man not usually given to superlatives, calls Williams "the greatest prospect we've ever had." Williams, a mild-mannered youngster with a warm, friendly smile when he isn't barreling into enemy linemen, was one of Ohio's best all-round high school athletes. In three seasons at Sandusky High he won nine letters—three in basketball (college scouts were amazed at his rebounding abilities), three in track (he won his district's shot-put title and anchored the mile relay team) and three in football (he was a unanimous All-Ohio fullback and made several scholastic All-America teams). Every time Williams ran with the ball he averaged 7.3 yards while, overall, he gained 3,059 yards, made 39 touchdowns and scored 260 points. Remarkably, his high school coach considered him just as valuable as a defensive corner-back and inside linebacker.
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September 21, 1964

He Doesn't Drag Them, He Scatters Them

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Stew Williams, Bowling Green's fullback, has exceptional balance for a 230-pounder (he's six feet tall), runs the 100 in 10.1 and is strong and aggressive. "When he hits the line he doesn't drag people, he just scatters them," says Freshman Coach Jim Ruehl. Varsity Coach Doyt Perry, a man not usually given to superlatives, calls Williams "the greatest prospect we've ever had." Williams, a mild-mannered youngster with a warm, friendly smile when he isn't barreling into enemy linemen, was one of Ohio's best all-round high school athletes. In three seasons at Sandusky High he won nine letters—three in basketball (college scouts were amazed at his rebounding abilities), three in track (he won his district's shot-put title and anchored the mile relay team) and three in football (he was a unanimous All-Ohio fullback and made several scholastic All-America teams). Every time Williams ran with the ball he averaged 7.3 yards while, overall, he gained 3,059 yards, made 39 touchdowns and scored 260 points. Remarkably, his high school coach considered him just as valuable as a defensive corner-back and inside linebacker.

Woody Hayes, who tried but failed to recruit Williams for Ohio State, did land Ray Pryor, a 6-foot 215-pounder who could be the top sophomore lineman in the Big Ten, if not the nation. Extremely strong and quick, Pryor, who was an All-Ohio center at Hamilton High, was switched to guard in spring practice. At center, guard or tackle, which he can also play, Pryor will be an asset to the Ohio State team.

Paired with the speedy Johnny Roland in the Missouri backfield will be Charlie Brown, a halfback flash who is even faster than Roland. An electrifying runner who can burst through the line or scoot around end for long gains, Brown is so quick getting started (he has run the 60-yard low hurdles in 6.8) that Quarterback Gary Lane has to hustle his hand-offs to Brown on dive plays. At Jefferson City (Mo.) High, Brown played in 28 consecutive winning games and during his senior year scored 138 points, rushed for 1,030 yards and averaged 10.9 yards a carry.

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