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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 05, 1964
CORRECTIONS AND AMENDMENTSSirs:Your college football issue (Sept. 21) was a masterpiece of writing and research—and as entertaining as it was informative.
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October 05, 1964

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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CORRECTIONS AND AMENDMENTS
Sirs:
Your college football issue (Sept. 21) was a masterpiece of writing and research—and as entertaining as it was informative.

However, you completely ignored mention of a charter member of the Western Athletic Conference—Brigham Young.
JON P. WARDRIP
Lancaster, Pa.

Sirs:
I'm distressed. No word of an Oklahoma Collegiate Athletic Conference school.

Northeastern State College in Tahlequah, Okla., for instance, finished last season undefeated and....
TOM J. PEAVLER
Yates Center, Kans.

Sirs:
Southerners are grateful for your cover of Auburn's Jimmy Sidle, and the story, And Auburn Runs the Most. But why let geographical boundaries decide who has good teams? More interconference play will not only reduce friction among the various conference divisions, it should strengthen our other athletic teams at the Pan American Games and the Olympics.
EDMUND DOLLAR
Bainbridge, Ga.

Sirs:
SI is right when it refers to the late George Wilson as the University of Washington's first All-America football player (Sept. 21), of course, but it wrongly identifies him as the present Detroit Lions' coach, who went to Northwestern, I believe. Nobody who lived on the Pacific Coast in the '20s could have made an error of this sort. Wilson was a world-famous figure there then, even if little known east of the Rockies. I believe he was famous even before college—he went to Everett (Wash.) High School, whose teams played an annual intersectional championship game with Oak Park, Ill.—Ernest Hemingway's old school. ( Bob Zuppke, the great University of Illinois coach who developed Red Grange, was, incidentally, the coach of those Oak Park teams and the friend and mentor of Hemingway.)

Wilson was boyish-looking, short, squarish and very fast. He led Washington to the Rose Bowl in 1924. In 1925, when Stanford was led by the invincible Ernie Nevers, Wilson carried Washington to a 13-0 victory over Stanford. For years Wilson had a sort of monopoly of all Seattle sportswriters: no other name was mentioned.
ROBERT L. TROUTMAN
Seattle

Sirs:
George Wilson was his name, all right, but Washington's first All-America had been a lonely San Francisco dock worker in recent years. He died last December. He was as great as Thorpe, Nevers and Grange.
JIM KIPPEN
San Francisco

Sirs:
Your report on Southern Illinois University states that, among other pass receivers, the school is counting on Harry Bobbitt. Unfortunately, Bobbitt died of pulmonary embolism this past summer.
BILL SCHRADER
Evansville, Ind.

VIVA LA DIFF�RENCE
Sirs:
The sale to CBS of the New York Yankees could be the most damaging blow ever dealt the sport. I compliment you 100% on your article, A Sad Day for Baseball (Sept. 21).

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