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A bad role for Omar the actor
Charles Goren
October 19, 1964
The best of the bridge-playing actors—and there are lots of good ones—is very likely Omar Sharif, who was disconsolate three years ago when he had to spend 18 months in the desert making Lawrence of Arabia and found there were no other bridge players in the cast. He made sure of avoiding any repetition of this competitive dry spell by having it written into his contract for a succeeding movie—The Yellow Rolls-Royce—that he could leave the London set for 15 days to play bridge. The specific days he had in mind were those in which he would be performing in his role of captain of the United Arab Republic team at the World Bridge Olympiad earlier this year. Sharif did play, but after what befell him in the hand below he might have wished he had stayed in England with Co-Star Ingrid Bergman and the Yellow Rolls.
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October 19, 1964

A Bad Role For Omar The Actor

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The best of the bridge-playing actors—and there are lots of good ones—is very likely Omar Sharif, who was disconsolate three years ago when he had to spend 18 months in the desert making Lawrence of Arabia and found there were no other bridge players in the cast. He made sure of avoiding any repetition of this competitive dry spell by having it written into his contract for a succeeding movie—The Yellow Rolls-Royce—that he could leave the London set for 15 days to play bridge. The specific days he had in mind were those in which he would be performing in his role of captain of the United Arab Republic team at the World Bridge Olympiad earlier this year. Sharif did play, but after what befell him in the hand below he might have wished he had stayed in England with Co-Star Ingrid Bergman and the Yellow Rolls.

Sharif sat North, opposed by the U.S. pair of Arthur Robinson, whose one spade overcall with the East hand proved decisive, and Robert Jordan.

On his first bid South would be better advised to say three diamonds in spite of his void in partner's suit. But surely at his second turn he should have bid not three clubs but three no trump, the only makable game contract. Even so, a sedate three-heart bid instead of the jump by Sharif might yet have saved the day. Because of Robinson's overcall, Jordan could not miss the killing spade lead. East cashed three top spades, and a fourth round let West score his 8 of trumps, down 200.

In the other room the North-South hands were held by the young California partnership, Donald Krauss and Robert Hamman, with Sharif's teammates sitting East-West. Here East was shy about bidding, but not North and South:

WEST

PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS

NORTH

1 [Heart]
3 [Heart]
4 N.T.
PASS

EAST

PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS

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