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Some little men who think they are Packers
Tom C. Brody
November 16, 1964
They come from Wittenberg University and they haven't lost in three years. All of which proves you can be as good as you want, especially if you have a Charlie Green who passes with the best and might become a pro
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November 16, 1964

Some Little Men Who Think They Are Packers

They come from Wittenberg University and they haven't lost in three years. All of which proves you can be as good as you want, especially if you have a Charlie Green who passes with the best and might become a pro

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"That's your son, Coach," an assistant informed him.

"Oh," said Edwards. "Well, get him out of there anyway. He isn't doing the job."

So direct an approach had an instantaneous effect, and Wittenberg had immediate if not overwhelming success. The latter did not come until the middle of the 1961 season, when Edwards' regular quarterback sprained an ankle. He had no choice then but to look Charlie Green right in the eye, take a deep breath and say, "You start."

"Green weighed 145 pounds," Edwards says, "and when he showed up for practice on opening day I thought someone was joshing me. Then I saw him throw a ball. I went right over to my backfield coach and told him to get that skinny kid ready."

Green was ready with two touchdown passes. That was 29 games ago and Wittenberg has not lost since. To go farther back. Green was the quarterback for a high school team that went 10-0 in his junior and senior years. In other words. Green hasn't started in a losing game in six years.

Wittenberg did have one close call this season. In its opening game with Baldwin-Wallace, Wittenberg trailed 26-14 with just six minutes left to play. Then came three significant developments. Green ran for a touchdown, the defense came alive and stopped Baldwin-Wallace cold and Green threw the deciding touchdown pass with only 15 seconds to play for a 28-26 win. After that nothing in the way of small-college teams could handle Wittenberg at all and the scores became 40-6, 49-0, 7 (oops)-0, then 35-0 40-14 and 40-7.

Did such a record reassure Edwards in the game last week with Wabash? Not much. First off, Wabash had let it be known that it did not think Wittenberg was invincible and had painted several signs on the home campus to prove it. Even more to the point was a pass defense that had not allowed a single touchdown all year and, finally, Green had a slightly sprained ankle. Green scored a touchdown in the first quarter and passed for another in the second. Still, it looked suspiciously like a ball game, with Wittenberg holding a 14-7 lead at the half.

"What happened during half time?" someone asked Green later. "I got sick," he said. Whatever he did, it worked. Green came out and immediately scored another touchdown, threw for two others, and about all that Wabash had left at the end were those signs saying: "Who says Wittenberg is invincible?"

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