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March 08, 1965
His famous bald head concealed beneath a fur hat instead of a helmet, Y.A. Tittle (below) took to the slopes near Tahoe City, Calif. for his first scrimmage on skis. Accompanied by sons Mike and Pat, the former Giant quarterback completed the outing with passing grades, despite some unexpected first downs.
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March 08, 1965

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His famous bald head concealed beneath a fur hat instead of a helmet, Y.A. Tittle (below) took to the slopes near Tahoe City, Calif. for his first scrimmage on skis. Accompanied by sons Mike and Pat, the former Giant quarterback completed the outing with passing grades, despite some unexpected first downs.

The most popular piece of furniture in Fred Astaire's Bel Air, Calif. home is a pool table. "I've been accused of building my house around it," says the dancing master, "and perhaps that's true." Astaire, who attended the U.S. billiard championships in nearby Burbank last week, has played with such top hats as Willie Mosconi. "Of course, I'm more or less a caddie to them," the actor admits, right on cue.

On a visit to Australia, Prince Philip expressed the hope that the newly founded Australian Conservation Foundation would be able to stem the slaughter of kangaroos, koalas and platypuses. "They are unique to Australia and only Australians can save them," chided the Prince. Soberly reporting the story, the Sydney Daily Minor also ran a picture of Philip with a bag of foxes and itemized his hunting record for the last three years, including a 1963 pheasant shoot during which the Duke and his party gunned down 428 pheasants in four hours.

"Ernest taught me all I know about fishing," said Mary Hemingway, just before departing for New Zealand and some marlin fishing. "I don't consider what I'll be doing as roughing it," she added. "If I wanted to rough it, I'd spend the winter in New York."

" Detroit goal by No. 9, Howe. Assist to No. 8, Howe," boomed the voice of the announcer. It was enough to make Red Wing fans blink, opponents shudder and Gordie Howe and his wife beam. The announcer was referring to Mark and Marty Howe, ages 9 and 11, who play for the Detroit Roostertails. This latest bit of Howe-to-do-it came in the sixth International Peewee Hockey Tournament against a team from Sherbrooke, Quebec. And, as usual, the Howes had it. The Roostertails won 5-4.

Her slacks were shapeless, the ski jacket hung like a sack and the gloves would have been bulky on a gorilla, but underneath all that was shapely Ann-Margret out for a spin on her motorcycle through Culver City. A very fast spin. And right by a cop to boot. A smile usually takes care of those things, but not this time. The stonehearted officer gave her a ticket and that was that. "My machine is geared for 80," she wailed. "What's the fun of having the thing if you can't cut it loose now and then?"

While resting at the Laguna Beach Country Club Village in California with the rest of the Russian national team between track meets, Igor Ter-Ovanesyan took a few golfing pointers from local pro Dave Adams. "I will be the champion golfer of the Soviet Union," the broad jumper announced proudly after one lesson. "I will also be the only golfer in the Soviet Union."

Never one to pass up a rugged challenge, Cliff Robertson decided to try a little bulldogging while vacationing at a dude ranch in Walsenburg, Colo. And why not? The hero of PT 109 had handled such things as a booming surf and a spirited horse with consummate skill. So Robertson bore down on the steer, flung himself from his horse and prepared to flip the critter. Unaware of the actor's imposing credentials, the steer flipped Robertson instead, injuring his right leg.

Fallen Skier of the Week: John F. Kennedy Jr., who stoically snowplowed about the bitter-cold slopes of Whiteface Mountain in New York without complaint until he collapsed into a mound of snow. He emerged saying: "I wanna go back to Hyannis Port."

No chip off the old block, Gary Farr, son of the former British world heavyweight challenger Tommy Farr, has been at various times a lumberjack, a deep-sea fisherman, a lifeguard and a wandering minstrel. Now he is a pop singer. In fact, the younger Farr has been just about everything in his 21 years except a fighter. And that's fine with Tommy. "No one is that hungry," said the old slugger. "Especially a boy of mine."

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