SI Vault
 
BASEBALL'S WEEK
Mark Mulvoy
May 03, 1965
AMERICAN LEAGUE Minnesota (6-2) flashed a new look—stout pitching, reckless base running and timely hitting—to win five straight. Harmon Killebrew's first 10 hits were singles; Jim Kaat (2-0) beat New York for the first time in five years; and Bob Allison stole three bases. Owner Cal Griffith attributed the quick getaway to the $300 "insubordination" fine that Sam Mele pasted on Shortstop Zoilo Versalles. "That woke up the club," he said. "I'm glad to see Sam get tough." Crafty Al Lopez had CHICAGO (7-3) in familiar second place. New Outfielders Danny Cater (see right) and Ken Berry (.276) were standouts. Lopez used five pinch hitters in one inning against Baltimore—tying a league record. Later three pinch hitters hit safely in a five-run inning against Washington. DETROIT (6-3) had an anemic .210 batting average but got solid relief pitching from Larry Sherry and Terry Fox. Before making five errors on ground balls in two days Shortstop Dick McAuliffe said, "I have nothing against Charlie Dressen, but I understand Bob Swift better. I know where I stand with him." BOSTON (5-3) got a scare when Dick Radatz was bombed in his first two outings, but The Monster growled again with six innings of one-hit ball against Baltimore. The return of favorite Rocky Colavito aroused enthusiasm in CLEVELAND (4-3); 44,335 saw the home opener. Rookies Jose Cardenal, Rudy May (a near no-hitter against Detroit) and Marcelino Lopez helped keep LOS ANGELES (4-6) respectable. After watching Boston score 23 runs against his Orioles, BALTIMORE (4-5) Manager Hank Bauer said, "That's the worst couple of days' pitching I've ever seen in my major league career." Bauer used eight pitchers one day, four the next. Later Baltimore acquired Don Larsen from Houston. Johnny Keane saw NEW YORK (5-6) lose its first three home games before numb-fingered Whitey Ford and Mel Stottlemyre stopped Los Angeles in a doubleheader. WASHINGTON (3-8) traded for home-run power but was outhomered 13-7. Even a 467-foot scoreboard-denting home run by Jim Gentile could not prevent KANSAS CITY (2-7) from settling into last place. Only 26,077, a low for K.C., came out for the three-game Yankee series.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 03, 1965

Baseball's Week

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

RUNS PRODUCED

 

Runs Scored

Teammates Batted In

Total Runs Produced

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Banks, Chi (.389)

6

11

17

Kranepool, NY (.447)

7

9

16

Santo, Chi (.351)

11

5

16

Brock, StL (.359)

11

3

14

Robinson, Cin (.353)

10

4

14

Mathews, Mil (.393)

7

6

13

Flood, StL (.341)

9

4

13

J. Alou, SF (.390)

6

6

12

Wynn, Hou (.341)

8

4

12

Pena, Chi (.225)

8

4

12

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Mantilla, Bos (.375)

4

10

14

Powell, Balt (.231)

7

7

14

Conigliaro, Bos (.438)

8

5

13

Thomas, Bos (.324)

6

7

13

Aparicio, Balt (.300)

7

6

13

Cater, Chi (.464)

8

4

12

Wagner, Clev (.346)

9

3

12

Green, Bos (.346)

9

3

12

Yastrzemski. Bos (.355)

8

4

12

Hall, Minn (.276)

9

3

12

Boxed statisics through Saturday, April 24

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Minnesota (6-2) flashed a new look—stout pitching, reckless base running and timely hitting—to win five straight. Harmon Killebrew's first 10 hits were singles; Jim Kaat (2-0) beat New York for the first time in five years; and Bob Allison stole three bases. Owner Cal Griffith attributed the quick getaway to the $300 "insubordination" fine that Sam Mele pasted on Shortstop Zoilo Versalles. "That woke up the club," he said. "I'm glad to see Sam get tough." Crafty Al Lopez had CHICAGO (7-3) in familiar second place. New Outfielders Danny Cater (see right) and Ken Berry (.276) were standouts. Lopez used five pinch hitters in one inning against Baltimore—tying a league record. Later three pinch hitters hit safely in a five-run inning against Washington. DETROIT (6-3) had an anemic .210 batting average but got solid relief pitching from Larry Sherry and Terry Fox. Before making five errors on ground balls in two days Shortstop Dick McAuliffe said, "I have nothing against Charlie Dressen, but I understand Bob Swift better. I know where I stand with him." BOSTON (5-3) got a scare when Dick Radatz was bombed in his first two outings, but The Monster growled again with six innings of one-hit ball against Baltimore. The return of favorite Rocky Colavito aroused enthusiasm in CLEVELAND (4-3); 44,335 saw the home opener. Rookies Jose Cardenal, Rudy May (a near no-hitter against Detroit) and Marcelino Lopez helped keep LOS ANGELES (4-6) respectable. After watching Boston score 23 runs against his Orioles, BALTIMORE (4-5) Manager Hank Bauer said, "That's the worst couple of days' pitching I've ever seen in my major league career." Bauer used eight pitchers one day, four the next. Later Baltimore acquired Don Larsen from Houston. Johnny Keane saw NEW YORK (5-6) lose its first three home games before numb-fingered Whitey Ford and Mel Stottlemyre stopped Los Angeles in a doubleheader. WASHINGTON (3-8) traded for home-run power but was outhomered 13-7. Even a 467-foot scoreboard-denting home run by Jim Gentile could not prevent KANSAS CITY (2-7) from settling into last place. Only 26,077, a low for K.C., came out for the three-game Yankee series.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sandy Koufax and Johnny Podres of LOS ANGELES (7-3) tested their tender left elbows and reported "no pain" after route-going wins. General Manager Buzzie Bavasi fretted: " Dr. Kerlan hasn't sent me his bill yet. Now I'm afraid." Dr. Robert Kerlan treats both pitchers and operated on Podres last June to remove a bone chip. Rookie Second Baseman Jim Lefebvre (.323) spanked seven extra-base hits. CHICAGO (6-3) pitchers finally got tough, hitting eight batters and preventing toeholds. The Cub staff last year hit only 17 batters for a major league low. Submarine Reliever Ted Abernathy did not allow a run in six outings. Ernie Banks returned to a crouch and had a .389 average. Gordy Coleman and Tony Perez, who share the first-base job at CINCINNATI (6-4), each hit grand-slam home runs. Sammy Ellis convinced Manager Dick Sisler this spring that he should start, ran off three straight wins. HOUSTON (6-6) returned to the Astrodome to complete a four-game win streak. Reliever Dave Giusti (2-0) and Catcher John Bate-man (four homers) excelled PHILADELPHIA (5-5) struggled with spotty pitching and hitting. For a time Dick Stuart was good field-no hit. Then Old Stone Glove had three hits against L.A. but let in four runs with an error. Bo Belinsky was kayoed twice. Now 44, Warren Spahn ("I hope Bobby Bragan reads about this") went nine innings twice to beat the Dodgers and Giants as NEW YORK (6-7) played exciting, come-from-behind baseball. Youngsters Ed Kranepool (a league-leading .457), Ron Swoboda (four homers in 18 at bats) and Dan Napoleon (game-winning triple) were prominent. PITTSBURGH (5-6) lost four straight after Reliever Al McBean had won one and saved two of the club's first seven. Gaylord Perry begged SAN FRANCISCO (5-7) Manager Herman Franks to leave him in the game, then blew an 8-2 lead to the Mets. " Cookie Lavagetto will go get the pitcher next time so he can't talk me out of it," said Franks. MILWAUKEE (3-5) passed up infield practice for extra batting practice but had the lowest team average (.210). The Braves were still without Hank Aaron and Rico Carty. As usual, St. Louis (3-6) started slowly, losing five of its first six. Curt Simmons and Ray Sadecki each lost their first two starts. Ed Spiezio, Phil Gagliano and Tito Francona were rushed into action and helped win two games.

PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Danny Cater's biggest problem was not American League pitching. It was finding a portable phonograph to take with him on the Chicago White Sox' first road trip so he could listen to the sound track from The Sound of Music. Quipped a White Sox pitcher, "The way he's hitting, they should buy him an orchestra." Acquired over the winter from Philadelphia, Cater, 25, led the American League with a .464 average and fractured Manager Al Lopez' plan to platoon Cater and Tom McCraw in left field. Danny had particular success against Washington's hapless pitchers. He went 6 for 8 in a doubleheader and five days later hit a two-run home run to beat the Senators 5-3. "I look for the fast ball all the time," he says. "If I start to look for something else they just throw the ball by me." Cater also says, "There's only one way I can hit .400—and that's if I quit the game right now." The pitchers wish he would. Cater is a Texan who claims he's the only Little League player who never pitched and admits he's very conscious about the fact that he's making only $8,500 this year. "I have no worries except money," he says. When he hit the home run to beat Washington, the organist played Do Re Mi as Danny circled the bases.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

1