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BASEBALL'S WEEK
Mark Mulvoy
May 31, 1965
AMERICAN LEAGUE Cleveland (4-3) Outfielder Vic Davalillo is called Yo-Yo, but the moniker should have been applied to the Indians. As usual, they were up and down—winning four, then losing three. General Manager Gabe Paul silenced Birdie Tebbetts' critics when he extended the manager's contract through 1966. Southpaw Jack Kralick finally won. Fred Whitfield beat Robin Roberts 1-0 with a single. And little Davalillo, only 5 feet 7 inches and 150 pounds, passed muscleman Outfielder Leon Wagner in RBIs when he knocked in six runs one night last week against Boston. Vic played with his left thumb taped, his right ankle tightly wrapped and his left hip heavily bandaged. Davalillo, 25, was a full-time pitcher/part-time pinch hitter until 1962 at Jacksonville. The manager sent him to center field, and Vic hit .346. He was Cleveland's regular center fielder the next spring. Admitted Tebbetts, "Vic's the best first baseman we have, too, but at 5 feet 7 inches he isn't a very good target." The Indians need the speedy Davalillo, a genuine ballhawk, in center field between Leon Wagner and Rocky Colavito. "I can go as far as I want either way," grinned Davalillo. Vic traced part of his batting prowess to "hitting left-handed pitchers to left field like No. 1 [Tebbetts] tells me." Reliever Bob Lee (two saves, one win and one home run) led LOS ANGELES' (4-3) revival against Chicago and Minnesota. The Angels were 1-6 against the same teams the previous week on the road. Laughed Lee, "Even the big, bad Twins can't hurt you here in Chavez Ravine." Jimmy Piersall's career probably ended when he suffered a broken kneecap after crashing into a foul pole, BOSTON (4-3) rookie Jim Lonborg shut out New York and stopped Cleveland. Dalton Jones was 14 for 26. Dick Radatz lost another game, also failed to maintain a tie score. Said Manager Billy Herman, "It looks like I've got to lose with that guy." Whitey Ford three-hit Washington, and suddenly the NEW YORK (4-4) world was not so bleak. Crying for pitching help, BALTIMORE (3-4) Manager Hank Bauer still refused Chicago's offer of Juan Pizarro for Oriole Outfielder Sam Bowens. "If we ever gave them Bowens," said Bauer, "I'd be afraid the White Sox would win by 20 games." CHICAGO (3-3) lost three in a row. Gary Peters gave up five runs, didn't retire a batter in Los Angeles. Manager Sam Mele benched MINNESOTA (3-3) sluggers Bob Allison and Harmon Killebrew after four straight losses. Jim Gentile and Wayne Causey, high-salaried KANSAS CITY (2-3) stars, did not play against left-handers. WASHINGTON (3-4) locked its dressing room for more than an hour after squandering ninth-and 10th-inning leads against DETROIT (3-4). The Tigers lost their fourth straight doubleheader. Although he delayed his return until May 31, Manager Charley Dressen said he told Denny McLain to "throw the ball, don't aim it," and that was why McLain had shut out the Senators.
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May 31, 1965

Baseball's Week

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TEAM LEADERS: OFFENSE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

   

Hits

TB

SB

LA

Parker

43

Parker

60

Wills

21

Cin

Pinson

48

Pinson

83

Harper-Pinson

7

StL

Flood

48

Flood

79

Brock

17

SF

J. Alou

55

Mays

118

Kuenn

3

Mil

Torre

38

Torre

70

Aaron

4

Chi

Williams

43

Santo

73

Beckert

4

Hou

Aspromonte

42

Wynn

68

Wynn

5

Phil

Allen

48

Allen

84

Taylor-Johnson

2

NY

Kranepool

42

Kranepool

64

Christopher

2

Pitt

Clendenon

39

Clendenon

55

Virdon

3

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Chi

Cater

40

Cater

59

Buford

3

Minn

Versalles

41

Versalles

73

3 tied with

3

Det

McAuliffe

43

McAuliffe

78

McAuliffe

3

Clev

Davalillo

39

Wagner

59

Howser

6

LA

Cardenal

42

Cardenal

62

Cardenal

7

Balt

Aparicio

40

Aparicio

68

Aparicio

5

Bos

Green

37

Conigliaro

64

3 tied with

2

NY

Richardson

40

Tresh

69

Mantle-Pepitone

2

Wash

Howard

36

Howard

61

Blasingame

3

KC

Campaneris

40

Gentile

57

Campaneris

10

Includes games of Saturday, May 22, 1965

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Cleveland (4-3) Outfielder Vic Davalillo is called Yo-Yo, but the moniker should have been applied to the Indians. As usual, they were up and down—winning four, then losing three. General Manager Gabe Paul silenced Birdie Tebbetts' critics when he extended the manager's contract through 1966. Southpaw Jack Kralick finally won. Fred Whitfield beat Robin Roberts 1-0 with a single. And little Davalillo, only 5 feet 7 inches and 150 pounds, passed muscleman Outfielder Leon Wagner in RBIs when he knocked in six runs one night last week against Boston. Vic played with his left thumb taped, his right ankle tightly wrapped and his left hip heavily bandaged. Davalillo, 25, was a full-time pitcher/part-time pinch hitter until 1962 at Jacksonville. The manager sent him to center field, and Vic hit .346. He was Cleveland's regular center fielder the next spring. Admitted Tebbetts, "Vic's the best first baseman we have, too, but at 5 feet 7 inches he isn't a very good target." The Indians need the speedy Davalillo, a genuine ballhawk, in center field between Leon Wagner and Rocky Colavito. "I can go as far as I want either way," grinned Davalillo. Vic traced part of his batting prowess to "hitting left-handed pitchers to left field like No. 1 [ Tebbetts] tells me." Reliever Bob Lee (two saves, one win and one home run) led LOS ANGELES' (4-3) revival against Chicago and Minnesota. The Angels were 1-6 against the same teams the previous week on the road. Laughed Lee, "Even the big, bad Twins can't hurt you here in Chavez Ravine." Jimmy Piersall's career probably ended when he suffered a broken kneecap after crashing into a foul pole, BOSTON (4-3) rookie Jim Lonborg shut out New York and stopped Cleveland. Dalton Jones was 14 for 26. Dick Radatz lost another game, also failed to maintain a tie score. Said Manager Billy Herman, "It looks like I've got to lose with that guy." Whitey Ford three-hit Washington, and suddenly the NEW YORK (4-4) world was not so bleak. Crying for pitching help, BALTIMORE (3-4) Manager Hank Bauer still refused Chicago's offer of Juan Pizarro for Oriole Outfielder Sam Bowens. "If we ever gave them Bowens," said Bauer, "I'd be afraid the White Sox would win by 20 games." CHICAGO (3-3) lost three in a row. Gary Peters gave up five runs, didn't retire a batter in Los Angeles. Manager Sam Mele benched MINNESOTA (3-3) sluggers Bob Allison and Harmon Killebrew after four straight losses. Jim Gentile and Wayne Causey, high-salaried KANSAS CITY (2-3) stars, did not play against left-handers. WASHINGTON (3-4) locked its dressing room for more than an hour after squandering ninth-and 10th-inning leads against DETROIT (3-4). The Tigers lost their fourth straight doubleheader. Although he delayed his return until May 31, Manager Charley Dressen said he told Denny McLain to "throw the ball, don't aim it," and that was why McLain had shut out the Senators.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Manager Gene Mauch of PHILADELPHIA (2-5) talked a good game, but that was all. Poking at ST. LOUIS' (6-1) poor pitching, Mauch stated: "The Cardinals are just hoping when they get beyond Bob Gibson." So, in successive games against the Phillies, the Cards' Ray Sadecki tossed a five-hitter to win his first after four losses, and Bob Purkey won with two innings of perfect relief. Then Gibson beat the Phils 12-2 for his eighth straight victory. Mauch still maintained: "The Phillies have enough talent to stand the league on its ear." CINCINNATI (4-1) was not convinced, either. The Reds grabbed two more from Philadelphia before losing on Catcher Johnny Edwards' error in the 10th inning. Concluded Mauch, "Generally we have to hit better, field better and pitch better." The Cardinals' pennant look—tight defense, daring speed and the clutch long ball—resulted in six straight wins. Catcher Tim McCarver hit four home runs. The Reds fielded at least six .300 hitters in every game and had the league's leading hitter in Gordy Coleman (.417). To remind the now svelte Coleman of his weight problem of past years, a teammate placed a giant tin of potato chips, five cartons of cheese dip and several steins of chilled beer in front of Coleman's locker after a game in which he went 4 for 5. For the week Coleman, who platoons at first base with Tony Perez, was 7 for 12, while Perez was 4 for 9. Joe Nuxhall beat Philadelphia, even though he was ejected late in the game for leading the bench jockeys. Dick Ellsworth of CHICAGO (4-2) beat the Dodgers with a 14-hitter, just six days after he had lost a one-hitter to them. Manager Bob Kennedy again complained that other clubs were stealing the Cubs's signs, especially after the opposition picked off three Chicago runners with pitchouts. Ron Fairly of LOS ANGELES (3-3) personally wrecked Houston. In successive games Fairly knocked in the tie-breaking run in the 11th inning, ruined Ken Johnson's no-hit bid with a double in the seventh and cracked a two-run homer to win in the 14th. Eddie Mathews (grand-slam homer) and Wade Blasingame (one-hitter) spoiled Warren Spahn's first start in MILWAUKEE (3-3). SAN FRANCISCO (4-3) was staked to early leads when Willie Mays hit three more first-inning home runs (six for the year). Bill Mazeroski returned to the PITTSBURGH (3-2) lineup, helped the Pirates take three straight from the Braves, NEW YORK (0-6) experienced late-game difficulties. The Braves turned Jim Hickman's smash into a game-ending double play after the Mets had loaded the bases. Trying to complete a similar double play for the Mets against St. Louis, Shortstop Roy McMillan throw wildly past first, two runs scored, and the Cardinals won 5-4. And Ron Swoboda botched a routine fly, allowing the Cards to tie a game and later win it. HOUSTON (2-5) Pitcher Ken Johnson saw Outfielder Jim Wynn misjudge Jim Ray Hart's fly into an inside-the-dome home run, then was traded to Milwaukee for Lee Maye.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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