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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
June 21, 1965
YANKEE DIVISIONSirs:I like your magazine very much, except for the fact that your predictions are too premature. Take, for example, the Chicago White Sox. When the Sox eked out two of three games from the "third division" Yankees you named them as the team to beat and did your best to minimize the importance of the game the Yanks won (A Different Kind of Season, June 7).
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June 21, 1965

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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YANKEE DIVISION
Sirs:
I like your magazine very much, except for the fact that your predictions are too premature. Take, for example, the Chicago White Sox. When the Sox eked out two of three games from the "third division" Yankees you named them as the team to beat and did your best to minimize the importance of the game the Yanks won (A Different Kind of Season, June 7).

A week later the high-flying Sox came into town ready for action, and what happens? They get clobbered. In the first game Bill Stafford shuts them out for 10 innings. Although the Yanks lost in the 15th, his performance was of tremendous importance. In the second game the Yankees won 4-3. The third and fourth games weren't even games. The "weak" Yankee staff allowed the Sox six runs (one unearned) in 43 innings. The Yanks got 22 runs off "the best staff in baseball." Now who's the team to beat?
JOEL ALLEN
New Orleans

Sirs:
You people should put Mr. Lopez of the White Sox on your staff. He, at least, will admit that the Yankees are not dead. I think Ford, Mantle and Co. proved that in New York a couple of weekends ago. Nice try, guys, but it will take more than an article in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED to keep the Bombers down.
BILL MILLER
Annapolis, Md.

?For further discussion of the Yankees, see page 20.—ED.

LOW BRIDGE
Sirs:
Being a student of bridge and a once-frequent tournament player, I was not appalled by the revelations of Buenos Aires (Four-finger Exercise, June 7). The fact that a personal idol, Mr. Terence Reese, was involved, is another matter.

Would an accusation of this sort be made in an international situation unless positive evidence were available? Mr. Reese's denial is, naturally, his only course of action. An admission of guilt on his part would constitute economic suicide as a bridge teacher and author.
ROBERT L. BRENT, M.D.
Philadelphia

Sirs:
Bridge players seldom have idols, but if I had one it would certainly be Terence Reese. No matter what he did—play, write, edit, commentate—it had a certain amount of class and style. And now this. Say it ain't so, Terence.
J. D. MEEHAN
Allison Park, Pa.

ROUND TWO
Sirs:
Thank you very much for the wonderful coverage of the Clay-Liston fight (June 7). I thoroughly enjoyed the articles by Tex Maule and Jim Murray.

I was especially pleased that someone tried to report the match as he saw it and didn't try to do a lot of second-guessing. The reason for all the protest was the supposed invincibility of Liston. Let's face it, he was a slow and plodding fighter, and Floyd Patterson, although a nice guy, was dumb (at least in those two fights).

Come on, let's give credit where it's due. Cassius Clay fought two darn good fights.
ED MULICK
Lansing, Mich.

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