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BASEBALL'S WEEK
Mark Mulvoy
August 16, 1965
AMERICAN LEAGUE The champagne for the Cellar-Bration Owner Charlie Finley has been promising his players for vacating last place was put back on ice when KANSAS CITY (4-3) moved within one game of ninth-place Boston after taking three of four from the Orioles. Since the All-Star break the Athletics have won 14 and lost 13, with a 9-5 record against first-division teams. Old hand Jim Landis beat the Orioles one day last week with a three-run homer, but the A's charge for the champagne was led mainly by the boys. First Baseman Ken Harrelson, 23, batted .284, had 12 RBIs and hit 13 of his 16 homers after becoming a regular two months ago. Dick Green, 24, who rates behind only Bobby Richardson as a second baseman, already has bettered his 1964 rookie records with 13 homers and 39 RBIs, while Shortstop Bert Campaneris, 23, led the league with 38 stolen bases and batted .303 during the A's revival. He started to field better, too, when Wayne Causey, whom he displaced at shortstop, gave him a wide-fingered glove and taught him to scoop grounders with his palm up. And Fred Talbot, 24, last week won his 10th game, four more than any other Kansas City pitcher. Talbot, who had a 4-5 record with Chicago last season, was the "player to be named later" in the Rocky Colavito, John Romano, Jim Landis, Mike Hershberger three-team trade last winter. "Being sent to Kansas City was my big break," said Talbot, who credits his success to an improved changeup and a seldom-used sinking fast ball. "I tried a few changeups last year, but it was my worst pitch. Every time I threw it and something went wrong, Al Lopez would jump me. This year I'm not afraid to throw it." Talbot uses the sinking fast ball only about 10 times a game. "I don't want to show it to the hitters too often because it would deprive me of the surprise element." Despite Harmon Killebrew's dislocated elbow, MINNESOTA (7-1) still had plenty of power: 50 runs scored and 11 home runs, including four by Zoilo Versalles and key pinch-hit homers by Jimmie Hall and .190 hitter Jerry Kindall. "I'm even-tempered—always upset," said CLEVELAND (3-3) Manager Birdie Tebbetts after a trying week. In one game Birdie ordered an intentional walk to Chicago's weak-hitting Ken Berry, then learned that J. C. Martin—not Hoyt Wilhelm—was listed to bat in the pitcher's spot after Berry. Martin singled in a run. Former Indian John Romano promptly yelled: "You're in trouble, Birdie, you're thinking again." DETROIT (2-5) players charged that CHICAGO (4-3) used frozen baseballs after the Tigers scored only eight runs in a five-game series and lost three times. (Said White Sox Manager Al Lopez: "We've been swinging frozen bats for 10 years.") In their first game after leaving Chicago the Tigers scored nine runs in one inning against the Indians. Sam Bowens, who hit 22 homers as a BALTIMORE (4-4) rookie last year, also had problems. He was sent to Rochester after batting .145. Whitey Ford and Mel Stottlemyre both won their 13th games for NEW YORK (4-2), but even better was the end of Mickey Mantle's season-long slump. He had 13 hits in 23 at bats last week. WASHINGTON'S (3-4) Don Zimmer made three errors to throw away the first game of a doubleheader, then doubled home the winning runs in the second game. Bob Lee, LOS ANGELES' (1-5) top reliever, lost twice, but Marcelino Lopez won his 11th, high for major league rookies this season. While Boston (2-4) floundered on the road, Owner Tom Yawkey, 62, played pepper at Fenway Park in 90� heat under the critical eyes of two of his injured outfielders, Tony Conigliaro and Gary Geiger.
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August 16, 1965

Baseball's Week

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RUNS PRODUCED

(through August 7)

 

Runs Scored

Teammates Batted In*

Total Runs Produced

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Rose, Cin (.321)

86

52

138

Harper, Cin (.278)

94

34

128

Robinson, Cin (.294)

75

51

126

Johnson, Cin (.284)

57

69

126

Clendenon, Pitt (.318)

66

56

122

Banks, Chi (.273)

58

62

120

Williams, Chi (.290)

72

47

119

Pinson, Cin (.293)

67

51

118

Callison, Phil (.270)

63

51

114

Mays, SF (.323)

72

41

113

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Oliva, Minn (.301)

83

53

136

Versalles, Minn (.237)

83

41

124

Colavito, Clev (.296)

67

54

121

Killebrew, Minn (.278)

73

48

121

Kaline, Det (.303)

58

48

106

Wagner, Clev (.285)

69

33

102

Tresh, NY (.273)

67

34

101

Horton, Det (.286)

49

50

99

Alvis, Clev (.273)

66

32

98

Mantilla, Bos (.309)

39

55

94

*derived by subtracting HRs from RBIs

AMERICAN LEAGUE
The champagne for the Cellar-Bration Owner Charlie Finley has been promising his players for vacating last place was put back on ice when KANSAS CITY (4-3) moved within one game of ninth-place Boston after taking three of four from the Orioles. Since the All-Star break the Athletics have won 14 and lost 13, with a 9-5 record against first-division teams. Old hand Jim Landis beat the Orioles one day last week with a three-run homer, but the A's charge for the champagne was led mainly by the boys. First Baseman Ken Harrelson, 23, batted .284, had 12 RBIs and hit 13 of his 16 homers after becoming a regular two months ago. Dick Green, 24, who rates behind only Bobby Richardson as a second baseman, already has bettered his 1964 rookie records with 13 homers and 39 RBIs, while Shortstop Bert Campaneris, 23, led the league with 38 stolen bases and batted .303 during the A's revival. He started to field better, too, when Wayne Causey, whom he displaced at shortstop, gave him a wide-fingered glove and taught him to scoop grounders with his palm up. And Fred Talbot, 24, last week won his 10th game, four more than any other Kansas City pitcher. Talbot, who had a 4-5 record with Chicago last season, was the "player to be named later" in the Rocky Colavito, John Romano, Jim Landis, Mike Hershberger three-team trade last winter. "Being sent to Kansas City was my big break," said Talbot, who credits his success to an improved changeup and a seldom-used sinking fast ball. "I tried a few changeups last year, but it was my worst pitch. Every time I threw it and something went wrong, Al Lopez would jump me. This year I'm not afraid to throw it." Talbot uses the sinking fast ball only about 10 times a game. "I don't want to show it to the hitters too often because it would deprive me of the surprise element." Despite Harmon Killebrew's dislocated elbow, MINNESOTA (7-1) still had plenty of power: 50 runs scored and 11 home runs, including four by Zoilo Versalles and key pinch-hit homers by Jimmie Hall and .190 hitter Jerry Kindall. "I'm even-tempered—always upset," said CLEVELAND (3-3) Manager Birdie Tebbetts after a trying week. In one game Birdie ordered an intentional walk to Chicago's weak-hitting Ken Berry, then learned that J. C. Martin—not Hoyt Wilhelm—was listed to bat in the pitcher's spot after Berry. Martin singled in a run. Former Indian John Romano promptly yelled: "You're in trouble, Birdie, you're thinking again." DETROIT (2-5) players charged that CHICAGO (4-3) used frozen baseballs after the Tigers scored only eight runs in a five-game series and lost three times. (Said White Sox Manager Al Lopez: "We've been swinging frozen bats for 10 years.") In their first game after leaving Chicago the Tigers scored nine runs in one inning against the Indians. Sam Bowens, who hit 22 homers as a BALTIMORE (4-4) rookie last year, also had problems. He was sent to Rochester after batting .145. Whitey Ford and Mel Stottlemyre both won their 13th games for NEW YORK (4-2), but even better was the end of Mickey Mantle's season-long slump. He had 13 hits in 23 at bats last week. WASHINGTON'S (3-4) Don Zimmer made three errors to throw away the first game of a doubleheader, then doubled home the winning runs in the second game. Bob Lee, LOS ANGELES' (1-5) top reliever, lost twice, but Marcelino Lopez won his 11th, high for major league rookies this season. While Boston (2-4) floundered on the road, Owner Tom Yawkey, 62, played pepper at Fenway Park in 90� heat under the critical eyes of two of his injured outfielders, Tony Conigliaro and Gary Geiger.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Willie Mays propelled SAN FRANCISCO (6-1) into second place as he went 14 for 30, hit six home runs, two each in two games, and drove in five runs in one game, four in another. "I'm swinging looser in this hot weather," said Willie, who led the majors with 30 home runs. Willie McCovey also chipped in with three homers and made fielding plays which Leo Durocher said "I never thought were possible for him." Even Warren Spahn got into the act. He won his first game since May 24. In six straight victories, their longest streak of the season, the Giants scored 47 runs, including 18 one day against CINCINNATI (2-4). The Reds hit 14 homers but used 16 pitchers in their four losses. Jim Maloney finally ended the pitching drought by shutting out the Dodgers 18-0. That's right: 18-0. Pitcher Howie Reed, starting for only the second time this year, and 31-year-old rookie Third Baseman Don LeJohn won games for LOS ANGELES (3-4), while Sandy Koufax boosted his record to 19-4. Pinch Hitter Jesse Gonder's three-run double won a game for MILWAUKEE (5-3), and PITTSBURGH'S (5-2) Vern Law shut out New York for the third successive time this year. "Law could throw a ball through a milk bottle," said Met Interim Manager Wes Westrum. Roberto Clemente had two home runs along with eight other hits and held a 15-point lead in the batting race. Manager Red Schoendienst of ST. LOUIS (4-4) was rehired through 1966 despite the team's disappointing showing. The punchless Cardinals had hit only 78 homers while giving up 127. HOUSTON (2-6) lost Walt Bond, Eddie Kasko, Rusty Staub and Frank Thomas with injuries, and Jim Gentile, Bob Aspromonte and Dick Farrell played despite assorted ailments. Explaining why he stopped pitching to bend over for a few seconds during his shutout of the Braves, Farrell said: "I was just surveying my twisted ankle, pulled side muscle and sore finger." Held to three hits, CHICAGO (5-2) beat the Mets one day as Billy Williams homered and doubled for five runs. PHILADELPHIA (4-3) players started to call Dick Stuart "Good Field, No Hit" because of his sudden glove prowess. NEW YORK (0-7) has lost 14 of 17 since Casey Stengel fractured his hip, including the last eight straight.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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