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FOOTBALL'S WEEK
John Underwood
October 18, 1965
In a year distinguished more for its upsets than for any sort of consistency, the favorites finally came through—and by comfortable margins, for a change. Arkansas and Texas coasted on their tough defenses to set up a mighty showdown this Saturday. Nebraska and USC looked ominously strong, the surprising boys of Georgia and the sudden monsters of Michigan State were marvelous again and so, in their negative way, were West Virginia's curious Mountaineers (below), who eschew defense for points, points, points
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October 18, 1965

Football's Week

In a year distinguished more for its upsets than for any sort of consistency, the favorites finally came through—and by comfortable margins, for a change. Arkansas and Texas coasted on their tough defenses to set up a mighty showdown this Saturday. Nebraska and USC looked ominously strong, the surprising boys of Georgia and the sudden monsters of Michigan State were marvelous again and so, in their negative way, were West Virginia's curious Mountaineers (below), who eschew defense for points, points, points

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Duke's Scotty Glacken and Pitt's Kenny Lucas tossed the ball around as if it were the incriminating Exhibit A in a murder trial. They each threw a touchdown pass, but Glacken also got one running, and that was the difference as the Blue Devils won 21-13. NORTH CAROLINA edged North Carolina State 10-7; MARYLAND rallied to take Wake Forest 10-7; VIRGINIA squeaked past VMI 14-10; and VIRGINIA TECH beat George Washington 17-12.

THE EAST

1. NAVY (2-1-1)
2. SYRACUSE (2-2)
3. ARMY (2-2)

Nobody really believed that Army could beat NOTRE DAME. But 61,000 went to New York's Shea Stadium to watch the Cadets try. What they saw was a bruising, sometimes dull, game. Notre Dame's Ara Parseghian knew the best part of Army's game was its wonderful defensive line. So he decided to start sophomore Quarterback Ted Schoen and come out passing. The ploy paid. With the ball on the Army 20, Schoen scrambled nimbly away from a determined Cadet rush and passed to End Don Gmitter for a touchdown. Senior Bill Zloch took over in the second half, and the Irish reverted to a ball control game. Nick Eddy scored on a five-yard run, and then Fullback Larry Conjar battered the spent Army forwards for 52 yards in 10 carries to set up a 23-yard field goal by Ken Ivan. Notre Dame won 17-0.

For a while it seemed that PENN STATE and Boston College were determined to give each other the game. The two fumbled and traded interceptions like kids in a schoolyard before State settled down and took advantage of the breaks—a bad BC punt and a fumble. Halfback Don Kunit ran over from the four and Fullback Dave McNaughton bulled 10 yards for a 17-0 victory, Coach Rip Engle's 100th at Penn State.

William and Mary made the sad mistake of scoring first against NAVY. The Middies' sophomore backs reacted like wounded rhinos. Quarterback John Cartwright completed 16 of 22 passes for 199 yards. Halfback Terry Murray wriggled over for three touchdowns and Navy won 42-14.

Cornell's Tom Harp had a gimmick ready for PRINCETON'S sidekicking Charley Gogolak—two light halfbacks who stood on the shoulders of tall tackles and tried to bat down his kicks. They succeeded in giving the AP a good national picture, but Gogolak kicked over the extra posts for 54- and 44-yard field goals and four extra points. However, it took three more touchdown passes and a 13-yard run by Tailback Ron Landeck to hold off Cornell 36-27.

The rest of the Ivies were predictable. DARTMOUTH, after some anxious moments, squeaked past Penn 24-19. Halfbacks Wally Grant and Bobby Leo ran Columbia dizzy to give HARVARD a 21-6 victory. YALE caught Brown 3-0 on Dan Begel's 23-yard field goal.

THE MIDWEST

1. NEBRASKA (4-0)
2. MICHIGAN STATE (4-0)
3. PURDUE (3-0-1)

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