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FOOTBALL'S WEEK
John Underwood
October 18, 1965
In a year distinguished more for its upsets than for any sort of consistency, the favorites finally came through—and by comfortable margins, for a change. Arkansas and Texas coasted on their tough defenses to set up a mighty showdown this Saturday. Nebraska and USC looked ominously strong, the surprising boys of Georgia and the sudden monsters of Michigan State were marvelous again and so, in their negative way, were West Virginia's curious Mountaineers (below), who eschew defense for points, points, points
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October 18, 1965

Football's Week

In a year distinguished more for its upsets than for any sort of consistency, the favorites finally came through—and by comfortable margins, for a change. Arkansas and Texas coasted on their tough defenses to set up a mighty showdown this Saturday. Nebraska and USC looked ominously strong, the surprising boys of Georgia and the sudden monsters of Michigan State were marvelous again and so, in their negative way, were West Virginia's curious Mountaineers (below), who eschew defense for points, points, points

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It was an awful study in anguish at Ann Arbor last Saturday. While 103,219 looked on in disbelief, MICHIGAN STATE'S big, fast linemen rushed at Michigan's backs like a gang of rumbling teen-agers. With Bubba Smith, a 268-pound end, 286-pound Middle Guard Harold Lucas and 211-pound End Bob Viney leading the terrible charge, and 218-pound Rover George Webster backing it up, the Spartans wrecked Michigan's running game, holding it to minus 39 yards. And when Wolverine Quarterback Dick Vidmer dropped back to pass, he was flattened so fast and so often that he began to look like a permanent fixture in the stadium floor. Meanwhile Quarterback Steve Juday, Halfback Clinton Jones and Fullback Bob Apisa—on a last-second 39-yard run—had a delightful time storming to three touchdowns, Dick Kenney, the barefoot Hawaiian, kicked two field goals, and unbeaten Michigan State won 24-7.

Who is the best quarterback in the country? If you ask Iowa's Jerry Burns, he has to say PURDUE'S Bob Griese. All Griese did was pick apart Iowa with his superb passes (20 of 35 for 216 yards), bruise the Hawk-eyes with his nifty running (for one score) and, finally, beat them 17-14 with two extra points and a 19-yard field goal. "How can you beat him?" asked Burns plaintively.

Ohio State had a one-man gang ready for Illinois, too. Grinding it out in pure Woody Hayes fashion, the Bucks sent Fullback Tom Barrington crashing through the Illini line 32 times for 179 yards and three touchdowns and won 28-14. MINNESOTA was more circumspect. Quarterback John Hankinson threw three touchdown passes to complement Fullback Joe Holmberg's two scores up the middle as the Gophers ran over Indiana 42-18. NORTHWESTERN regained some much-needed face for the suffering Big Ten, beating Oregon State 15-7. But Wisconsin did not have a chance against NEBRASKA. Quarterback Fred Duda tormented the poor Badgers, running 59 yards for one touchdown and passing 29 to little Frankie Solich for another. The Huskers won easily 37-0. "They didn't surprise us," said Coach Milt Bruhn. "They did what they've been doing well—in fact, better."

Nebraska, though, may be in for trouble from some of its Big Eight neighbors. MISSOURI won its third straight, over Kansas State 28-6, while COLORADO routed Oklahoma State 34-11 as sophomores Dick O'Dell and William Harris ran for three touchdowns. Winless Kansas went down again, to IOWA STATE 21-7.

Strange things were happening to perennial powers in the Mid-American Conference. TOLEDO'S green youngsters, who did not figure to beat many teams, upset Ohio U. 21-7 for their third win. BOWLING GREEN, favored to win the league title, barely got by Western Michigan 21-17, while the heir presumptive, KENT STATE, took Miami of Ohio 24-13.

THE SOUTHWEST

1. TEXAS (4-0)
2. ARKANSAS (4-0)
3. TEXAS TECH (3-1)

The preliminaries are over; the lines drawn. Season No. 2 starts Saturday in Fayetteville when Texas meets Arkansas.

Getting its habitually splendid, balanced ground game from Bobby Burnett inside and Harry Jones outside, ARKANSAS thrived on the absence of Terry Southall and ripped crippled Baylor 38-7. The Hogs intercepted more Bear passes (6) than they caught of their own (4) and used one of the former (Tommy Trantham's 69-yard touchdown) late in the first half for the early killer.

Many Oklahoma ticket holders stayed home rather than visit the Cotton Bowl for the game with TEXAS. They must have had a vision. Marv Kristynik and Tommy Nobis again took starring roles as the Steers stampeded 19-0. The one bright note for the Sooners was their own linebacker, Carl McAdams, who gave as good as he got. The Oklahoma offense, however, was pitiful (only six first downs). The visitors did salvage something. Oklahoma's band took up the entire half-time show, preventing Texas from going on. "We won the game, they won the band," said an unconcerned Texan.

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