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THE MAN FOR THE NEXT FEW SEASONS
Dan Jenkins
November 08, 1965
Pastoral and remote for so long, Arkansas has gained a new image, thanks to the brilliance of runners like Harry Jones (right) and an excitable coach named Frank Broyles, who has become
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November 08, 1965

The Man For The Next Few Seasons

Pastoral and remote for so long, Arkansas has gained a new image, thanks to the brilliance of runners like Harry Jones (right) and an excitable coach named Frank Broyles, who has become

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Now you can. And you can send Frank Broyles to talk to him, anywhere. "Tell you what," says one Razorback rooter. "Frank'll get out of bed with a fever and come talk to your booster club, and he'll draw 500 folks in the smallest bitty town."

The improvements continue with the victories. Pre-Broyles, there were just three Arkansas booster clubs in the state. Now: 23. Pre-Broyles, the Fayetteville stadium held 31,000. Next year: 51,000. Pre-Broyles, the Little Rock stadium held 32,000. Now: 47,000. The athletic dorm is being redecorated, with study and recreational rooms added. The legislature is even cooperating, beyond the point of raising the salaries of Broyles, his assistants and President Mullins. A bill may soon pass that will consolidate more high schools in the state, which means that 50 more schools will be playing football. "And you might get 10 or 12 pretty good boys out of those," smiles Frank.

One last factor in Arkansas' favor is an ideal schedule, annually. First, Broyles got rid of Ole Miss as a steady opponent. "The Texas game could never be our big one as long as we were going to meet Ole Miss, too," he says. "Besides, seven conference teams is enough tearer-uppers." Next, in every season since 1961 he has scheduled a hand-chosen patsy—Northwest Louisiana (42-7), Hardin-Simmons (49-7), Tulsa (56-7), Wichita (17-0) and North Texas (56-20)—to follow the Texas game. Next year: Kansas State. "It gives us a mental rest," he says. "It's a definite advantage. As General Neyland used to say, 'When they look back at that 9-1 they don't ask who the nine were.' "

When he first came to Arkansas, Broyles had a little trouble selling the soft spot in the schedule to the fans, many of whom were disappointed to lose Ole Miss. But he was speaking to a booster group a few years ago and a fellow in the audience spoke up.

"Coach," he said, "it looks like to me if we're tryin' to win a lot of ball games, it would be nice to have several Northwest Louisianas on our schedule."

Broyles squealed delightedly, like a sooey pig.

"You're right, brother!" he yelped. "Brother, you're so right."

But as Frank Broyles is proving now, it does not much matter who Arkansas plays. The results seem to be the same. Some day, perhaps not in the very near future, J. Paul Scott will have to write a song about a very unique occasion: the day Arkansas lost.

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