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November 22, 1965
THE EASY WAYAfter its narrow victory over Oklahoma State last Saturday, Nebraska's football team announced it had accepted an invitation to play in the Orange Bowl on New Year's Day. The hasty decision was apparently made by "the kids," as coaches like to refer to their troops. The kids preferred the Orange Bowl and Miami to the Cotton Bowl and Dallas, and it's hard to blame them if it's a holiday they're after. But it must be remembered that if Notre Dame beats Michigan State then Arkansas and Nebraska, barring an upset, will rank first and second in the country. If the Nebraskans are still chasing the No. 1 position that their coach, Bob Devaney, thinks they deserve, why aren't they going to Dallas, where they could meet Arkansas on New Year's Day and do something positive to prove their right to that lofty rank?
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November 22, 1965

Scorecard

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THE EASY WAY
After its narrow victory over Oklahoma State last Saturday, Nebraska's football team announced it had accepted an invitation to play in the Orange Bowl on New Year's Day. The hasty decision was apparently made by "the kids," as coaches like to refer to their troops. The kids preferred the Orange Bowl and Miami to the Cotton Bowl and Dallas, and it's hard to blame them if it's a holiday they're after. But it must be remembered that if Notre Dame beats Michigan State then Arkansas and Nebraska, barring an upset, will rank first and second in the country. If the Nebraskans are still chasing the No. 1 position that their coach, Bob Devaney, thinks they deserve, why aren't they going to Dallas, where they could meet Arkansas on New Year's Day and do something positive to prove their right to that lofty rank?

$25 GOLF BALLS
Goodness gracious, what they are doing to golf! The Professional Golfers' Association announced recently that any golfer who so much as dares to throw a ball to the gallery after winning a tournament will be fined $25 for such an outward and tawdry display of jubilation. The PGA suggests that people will be injured scrambling for the ball, although no recent casualty lists have been presented. One of our golf writers, however, rather likes the ruling. "It's the first positive decision the PGA has made in years," he says.

TROUBLE IN SUMTER
The way things have been going for the New York Yankees lately they would end up in the wrong half of their class in a television toothpaste test. Last week Del Webb, who sold his share of the Yankees to CBS last year, brought up a point that is not going to make Yankee fans very happy, the club seems to be in trouble with Bobby Richardson, the best second baseman in baseball. Webb said he doubted that Richardson would be back for the 1966 season. Bobby has hinted that he might stay home in Sumter, South Carolina either to study for the ministry or go into youth work for the YMCA. His desire to quit is not a ploy to gain a raise in pay. "We offered him $60,000 to play last season," said Webb, "and there's something funny about that. Bobby said he wasn't worth that much. Maybe $40,000 or $45,000. He said he didn't want to appear to be dictating terms, but maybe we could give the $15,000 or $20,000 to some worthy cause and keep him in mind for a scouting job or something later on." Webb did not say whether the Yankees complied. Del may find "something funny" in Richardson's attitude but, if Bobby does indeed retire, we doubt that the Yankees will.

MY MOTHER, THE COACH

A Dallas high school coach had, he was sure, a great idea: the players' parents could sit with them on the bench for the big homecoming game. "You can have either your mother or your father sit next to you with your number on a card on their backs," he told them. "How would you like that?"

A voice from the rear of the locker room said: "We got too many coaches on the field right now. We sure don't want 40 of 'em down there."

PRICE FIGHT

If one is willing to throw out some of those grand old "heavyweight championship" fights of the past—such as those pitting Floyd Patterson against Pete Rademacher, Roy Harris, Brian London and Tom McNeeley—history leans heavily toward the underdog in title fights when the participants are meeting for the first time. Patterson himself, for example, beat Archie Moore as a 6-to-5 underdog; Ingemar Johannson won over Patterson at 4 to 1; and Cassius Clay defeated Liston with a price of 7 to 1 against him.

Last week Jimmie (The Greek) Snyder, dean of the Las Vegas oddsmakers, issued a bouquet of odds on the Patterson-Clay fight (page 34). At fight time Snyder believes that Floyd will be a 3�-to-1 underdog. He further suggests odds of 5 to 1 against Patterson winning on a knockout and even money that the fight does not go eight rounds. Here are Snyder's proposed knockout odds on either fighter round by round: 1) 20 to 1, 2) 15 to 1, 3) 12 to 1, 4) 10 to 1, 5) 8 to 1, 6) 6 to 1, 7) 4 to 1, 8) 3 to 1, 9) 15 to 1, 10) 15 to 1, 11) 15 to 1, 12) 25 to 1, 13) 25 to 1, 14) 35 to 1 and 15) 50 to 1. Just in case you are wondering about that tempting 50-to-1 price in the 15th, the last time it happened was way back in 1931 when Max Schmeling stopped Young Stribling.

IT'S A RAID!
Sears, Roebuck is advertising a combination pool table and sofa in its Christmas catalog. When a game is over, the bed of the pool table flips over and down and becomes the vertical back of an "elegant Danish Style Sofa." Just like in one of those old George Raft movies on the late show. Out this way, Blackie, quick!

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