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FOOTBALL'S WEEK
Dan Jenkins
November 22, 1965
With almost indecent haste, bowl promoters were in the winners' locker rooms, contracts in hand. The Orange Bowl signed up Nebraska—precluding any chance of a 'national championship' game should the Cornhuskers and Arkansas finish as the two top teams of the year—while the Sugar Bowl collected Missouri and the Gator Bowl Georgia Tech. Meanwhile 1965 continued to be a year of dazzling individuals (next pages), and none was brighter than Donny Anderson, who ran through Baylor last weekend and now leads once-beaten Texas Tech against Arkansas with the Southwest Conference title and the Cotton Bowl at stake
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November 22, 1965

Football's Week

With almost indecent haste, bowl promoters were in the winners' locker rooms, contracts in hand. The Orange Bowl signed up Nebraska—precluding any chance of a 'national championship' game should the Cornhuskers and Arkansas finish as the two top teams of the year—while the Sugar Bowl collected Missouri and the Gator Bowl Georgia Tech. Meanwhile 1965 continued to be a year of dazzling individuals (next pages), and none was brighter than Donny Anderson, who ran through Baylor last weekend and now leads once-beaten Texas Tech against Arkansas with the Southwest Conference title and the Cotton Bowl at stake

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Unbeaten PRINCETON and unbeaten DARTMOUTH were ready for an eastern showdown Saturday. The Tigers chopped away at Yale with their usual �lan and won 31-6 for their 17th in a row. Tailback Ron Landeck ran for three touchdowns and passed for a fourth, and Charley Gogolak, automatic as ever, booted a 48-yard field goal and four extra points. He now has 48 straight conversions, four more than his brother Pete, who held the NCAA record. Dartmouth, nursing a 6-0 lead on Bill Hay's two field goals, put down Cornell 20-0 when Earl Mabry ran back a punt 72 yards and Quarterback Mickey Beard raced 10 yards after taking a lateral from Pete Walton.

The way things had been going for the ARMY team, Wyoming need only have presented its credentials—a shiny 6-1 record—and accepted victory gracefully. What did happen was that the Cowboys and their superb passer, paunchy but quick Quarterback Tom Wilkinson, gave the Cadets an object lesson in 99-yard football. It was that last yard that Army had down pat, however, and that was the difference. Army scored once when startled End Sam Champi found a bumped Wilkinson pass coming his way and ran 45 yards. Minutes later, Army scored again when Quarterback Curt Cook hit Terry Young with a pass in the end zone and Army led 13-0. Then Wyoming took over, except for that last yard. Twice the surging Cowboys fumbled going into the end zone, and Army's alert Sam Bartholomew recovered; another time they were stopped dead on the one, after Mike Davenport slipped going in for a sure score.

Navy's day was thoroughly unrewarding. For a change PENN STATE stayed loose against the blitzing Middies, ran well, passed effectively and broke the Navy attack with a firm defense. Quarterback Jack White and sophomore Split End Jack Curry set State passing records for yards gained (1,120) and catches (37) in a season, Don Kunit ran 22 yards and Mike Irwin five for touchdowns, and the Nittany Lions won 14-6. Now, with two games to go, State can still achieve its 27th consecutive winning season.

Harvard, surprisingly, came out passing, threw its first touchdown pass of the year and beat Brown 17-8. PENN, more used to the pass, used sophomore Bill Cree-den's three touchdown throws to overtake Columbia 31-21.

Boston College, with Quarterback Ed Foley throwing three scoring passes, routed William & Mary 30-17, but Boston U., enjoying its best season in years, was suddenly brought up short by DELAWARE 50-7. AMHERST Quarterback Johnny Pass-more lived up to his name against old rival Williams. He passed and passed, throwing for four touchdowns to give the Lord Jeffs a 42-8 victory and the Little Three title. The small brutes from Maine went down for the first time, to TAMPA 2-0.

THE SOUTHWEST

1 ARKANSAS (9-0)
2. TEXAS TECH (8-1)
3. SMU (4-3-1)

For Arkansas Coach Frank Broyles it was very much a routine day. The Razor-backs followed his simple game plan—to win—and beat Southern Methodist 24-3 for their 21st straight. Later, in the locker room, Broyles confined his remarks to, "Hurry it up guys, we gotta catch that plane," and he was back home in Fayetteville by 8 p.m. SMU was not quite as submissive as that sounds and actually led after Quarterback Mac White marched the Mustangs within Dennis Partee's field-goal range. Thereafter, per Broyles's instructions, his defensive monster was free to guess in what direction White planned to roll out. He usually had it right, and White was shut off. SMU, meanwhile, had worse luck outwitting Arkansas' Jon Brittenum, whose sprint-out option runs and passes set up all 24 points.

Texas Christian's Bruce Alford Jr. kicked four field goals, and the Frogs's bruising defense forced—and recovered—four Texas fumbles in a 25-10 shellacking of Texas in Austin. "When the locusts arrive they devour everything," said Darrell Royal, whose Longhorns now have lost four of five. Eddie McKaughan's 19-yard pass to John Poss and Glynn Lindsey's conversion with less than three minutes to play lifted TEXAS A&M over Rice 14-13.

Houston, one of the season's major disappointments until it upset Mississippi last week, stunned Kentucky 38-21 as Quarterback Bo Burris threw for three second-half touchdowns. The Cougars intercepted five passes, including two by Gus Hollomon that set up touchdowns. LAMAR TECH clipped West Texas State 21-14, and MEMPHIS STATE shattered North Texas State 28-0.

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