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A quiz to see if you like to fight
Charles Goren
December 20, 1965
'Don't bid unless you've got the cards' was for years a sound axiom for run-of-the-neighborhood bridge. Now this is changing. Even the most timid souls are wading in with harassing competitive bids. Do you know when to compete, and how? This quiz is designed to test how up-to-date your fighting instincts are. If you score 50 points or more you are a battler to beware of, and 35 or more means you have a fighting chance. But if your score is under 30 you had better hope your partner can do your brawling for you
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December 20, 1965

A Quiz To See If You Like To Fight

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5
4 SPADES—5 PTS. DOUBLE—3 PTS. 3 SPADES—1 PT.

Surely you would not allow yourself to be shut out if you held small cards instead of the spade jack and the club queen. Hence the vast difference in awards between four spades, which properly depicts your hand, and three spades, which might be a strained competitive effort. A double might work well, but partner is unlikely ever to credit you with such a powerful spade suit, or he might even pass for an inadequate penalty.

6
3 CLUBS—5 PTS. PASS—3 PTS. DOUBLE—1 PT. 1 HEART—1 PT.

Only by a jump in clubs can you make it clear to partner that you have a fair hand with nearly solid clubs. A pass may work out if the opponents blunder into hearts or if East winds up in no trump. A double will lead to problems if partner bids spades. A one-heart bid might strike oil or trouble. But these last two bids should score over two clubs, which allows West to come in cheaply and sounds to partner like a cue bid.

7
3 SPADES—5 PTS. 3 NO TRUMP—3 PTS. 3 HEARTS—1 PT.

Having told partner by passing on the preceding round that your strength is limited, he should not think that you have suddenly discovered a hidden ace and turned slam-minded. This cue bid is an effort to place a three-no-trump contract in the proper hand if partner has Q-x or J-x-x in spades. Obviously, three no trump is not a good choice, although it is better than three hearts, which in turn must be awarded something more than a possible four diamonds, which carries us beyond the no trump game. A pass is bad. Partner had expected his bid to be treated as forcing.

8
5 HEARTS—5 PTS. 5 DIAMONDS—3 PTS. 5 SPADES—2 PTS.

Partner's four no trump is a three-suit takeout double, not an "unusual" no-trump demand for a minor suit. Diamonds is likely to prove an inferior trump suit. If we play it at hearts, we may be able to pitch losing diamonds on good clubs. Five spades might get to a good slam, but it is more likely to heap unwarranted punishment on a properly competitive partner.

9
PASS—5 PTS. 3 HEARTS—2 PTS. DOUBLE—1 PT.

East's bid is forcing, so why slow up the opponents by doubling when you will surely get an opportunity later to double a higher contract? Three hearts might stir up the animals by leading each opponent to believe that the other is short, but it might also let the opponents off the hook.

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