SI Vault
 
SCORECARD
February 28, 1966
OUT WITH THE NEWNo doubt the new stadiums we see sprouting on sports pages everywhere are right up to the minute, but they leave us a little melancholy. The architects have removed the posts, which were among the lesser faults of the old parks, but they also seem to have buried the old rowdy intimacy of those parks beneath the bland symmetries and lollipop hues of the new. We'll take Yankee Stadium, posts and all, over Shea in New York, and after viewing pictures of St. Louis' vast new saucer we have a feeling that the players will look like pygmies from our seat, wherever it is. Stan Musial never looked small in Sportsman's Park when he rifled a shot into the right-field screen, nor did Carl Furillo in Ebbets Field when he played one off the wall.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
February 28, 1966

Scorecard

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

OUT WITH THE NEW
No doubt the new stadiums we see sprouting on sports pages everywhere are right up to the minute, but they leave us a little melancholy. The architects have removed the posts, which were among the lesser faults of the old parks, but they also seem to have buried the old rowdy intimacy of those parks beneath the bland symmetries and lollipop hues of the new. We'll take Yankee Stadium, posts and all, over Shea in New York, and after viewing pictures of St. Louis' vast new saucer we have a feeling that the players will look like pygmies from our seat, wherever it is. Stan Musial never looked small in Sportsman's Park when he rifled a shot into the right-field screen, nor did Carl Furillo in Ebbets Field when he played one off the wall.

OLD ACQUAINTANCE

When Ernie Terrell applied to the New York State boxing commission for a license last month he testified, in sum, that Bernie Glickman, who had been conspicuously and unexpectedly in his corner for the George Chuvalo fight, was no longer associated with him. Glickman is an old acquaintance of Frankie Carbo, Blinky Palermo and Tony Accardo, mobsters all, and the boxing commission was not inclined to think that old acquaintance was apt to be forgot. Even after Terrell swore that his relationship with Glickman had been at most evanescent, the commission denied him a license and thereby blew all chances of having the Clay-Terrell title fight in New York. The commission was roundly criticized by some, particularly because it offered no proof of a continuing relationship between Glickman and Terrell.

Well, if boxing commissions needed the kind of evidence that is necessary in a court of law the mob would still dominate prizefighting. Perhaps nettled by the criticism, the commission last week took the unusual step of releasing a transcript of the Terrell hearing. It disclosed that Terrell's traveling companion on a recent flight from Chicago to New York had been none other than Bernie Glickman. Not hard, fast proof of a continued relationship, to be sure, not the way the courts would want it, but it was good enough for the commission, which also may have taken into consideration the fact that Terrell blandly testified to an astonishing ignorance about Glick-man's connections with the mob. Anyone in boxing who did not know about that, and its significance, would be classified 1-Y by his draft board.

A DIFFERENCE OF OPINION

Commissioner Pete Rozelle adjourned the NFL meeting at Palm Beach in a euphoric mood. Business looked red-hot, and the new Atlanta team had been stocked with some reasonably able bodies. Rozelle discounted 1) the threat of Teamster Boss Jimmy Hoffa to unionize pro players, 2) the alleged perils of high bonus payments to rookies and 3) the idea of a common draft or any other accommodation with the rival AFL.

From out of the West came a loud dissent from an AFL (and former NFL) head coach and general manager. "They may be laughing at Hoffa now," said San Diego's Sid Gillman, "but the Teamsters Union will get in within three years unless the club owners get together and put a stop to this crazy spending on bonus players."

THE PRESIDENT'S LIBRARY

In the old days, if you were spending the night at the White House and could not sleep, it did you no good to grope around the library for something to read. There were no books in the library. Then the American Booksellers Association began donating (every four years) 200 to 250 worthy works published during each successive presidential administration. The current gift was announced last week, and for the first time it includes a good many sports books.

Mrs. Millard Fillmore, a brilliant ex-schoolteacher, could not find a single book when she entered the White House in 1850, not even a Bible. As a result of her spirited work (she also installed the first bathtub), Congress shamefacedly appropriated $250 to buy books, and the ABA has carried on.

Continue Story
1 2 3